Pediatric phantom dosimetry of kodak 9000 cone-beam computed tomography

Juan Yepes, Megan R. Booe, Brian Sanders, James Jones, Ygal Ehrlich, John B. Ludlow, Brandon Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiation dose of the Kodak 9000 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) device for different anatomical areas using a pediatric phantom. Methods: Absorbed doses resulting from maxillary and mandibular region three by five cm CBCT volumes of an anthropomorphic 10-year-old child phantom were acquired using optical stimulated dosimetry. Equivalent doses were calculated for radiosensitive tissues in the head and neck area, and effective dose for maxillary and mandibular examinations were calculated following the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Results: Of the mandibular scans, the salivary glands had the highest equivalent dose (1,598 microsieverts [µSv]), followed by oral mucosa (1,263 µSv), extrathoracic airway (pharynx, larynx, and trachea; 859 µSv), and thyroid gland (578 µSv). For the maxilla, the salivary glands had the highest equivalent dose (1,847 µSv), followed closely by oral mucosa (1,673 µSv), followed by the extrathoracic airway (pharynx, larynx, and trachea; 1,011 µSv) and lens of the eye (202 µSv). Conclusion: Compared to previous research of the Kodak 9000, completed with the adult phantom, a child receives one to three times more radiation for mandibular scans and two to 10 times more radiation for maxillary scans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-232
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Dentistry
Volume39
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
Mouth Mucosa
Radiation
Pediatrics
Larynx
Pharynx
Trachea
Salivary Glands
Crystalline Lens
Maxilla
Thyroid Gland
Neck
Head
Equipment and Supplies
Research

Keywords

  • Children
  • Cone beam computed tomography
  • Dosimetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Pediatric phantom dosimetry of kodak 9000 cone-beam computed tomography. / Yepes, Juan; Booe, Megan R.; Sanders, Brian; Jones, James; Ehrlich, Ygal; Ludlow, John B.; Johnson, Brandon.

In: Pediatric Dentistry, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 229-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yepes, Juan ; Booe, Megan R. ; Sanders, Brian ; Jones, James ; Ehrlich, Ygal ; Ludlow, John B. ; Johnson, Brandon. / Pediatric phantom dosimetry of kodak 9000 cone-beam computed tomography. In: Pediatric Dentistry. 2017 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 229-232.
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