Perceptions of colon cancer screening by stage of screening test adoption

Usha Menon, Rhonda Belue, Celette Sugg Skinner, B. Erin Rothwell, Victoria Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Colorectal cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. To fully realize the benefits of early detection of colorectal cancer, screening rates must improve. This study assessed differences in beliefs (from the Health Belief Model) by stage of screening behavior adoption (based on the Transtheoretical Model of Change) as a foundation for intervention development. More people were in the precontemplation stage (not thinking about having the screening test) for fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy versus contemplation (thinking about having the test) or action (adherent with screening). Those in precontemplation stage for fecal occult blood test had lower perceived risk than those in contemplation, lower perceived benefits than those in action, and higher barriers than both those in contemplation and those in action. For sigmoidoscopy stage of readiness, again, precontemplators had lower perceived risk and self-efficacy than contemplators and higher barriers than both contemplators and actors. Given the popularity of the transtheoretical model and the success of stage-based interventions to increase other cancer screening, especially mammography, we should begin to translate such effective interventions to colorectal cancer screening. As such, this study is one of very few to quantify beliefs across stages of colorectal cancer and identify significant differences across stages, laying the foundation for the development and testing of stage-based interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-185
Number of pages8
JournalCancer nursing
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer screening
  • Early detection
  • Health belief model
  • Stages of change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

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