Performance of elderly African American and White community residents on the CERAD neuropsychological battery

Gerda G. Fillenbaum, Albert Heyman, Marc S. Huber, Mary Ganguli, Frederick Unverzagt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The CERAD Neuropsychological Battery, includes 7 measures: Verbal Fluency; Modified Boston Naming; Mini-Mental State; Word List Learning, Recall and Recognition; Constructional Praxis. It was originally developed to evaluate patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but is increasingly used in epidemiological studies of the incidence and prevalence of dementia in the elderly. The current study reports norms for African American and White representative community residents 71 years of age and older in North Carolina, and compares performance with that of African Americans in Indianapolis and with Whites in the Monongahela Valley, Pennsylvania. For all 3 studies, increased education and younger age was related to better performance on each of the 7 measures. Sex differences, when present, tended to favor women. Although on average African Americans performed more poorly than Whites, with demographic characteristics controlled, no significant racial differences were found in the North Carolina sample. Both African American and White participants in North Carolina performed more poorly than their racial counterparts in the other 2 studies, possibly because of selection-induced differences in health and educational status. Nevertheless, the use of an identical evaluation battery, such as the CERAD neuropsychologic instrument, facilitates comparisons not otherwise possible, and should be encouraged.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)502-509
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

African Americans
Educational Status
Sex Characteristics
Health Status
Dementia
Epidemiologic Studies
Alzheimer Disease
Demography
Learning
Education
Incidence

Keywords

  • African American
  • CERAD
  • Elderly
  • Neuropsychology measures
  • Population means

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Performance of elderly African American and White community residents on the CERAD neuropsychological battery. / Fillenbaum, Gerda G.; Heyman, Albert; Huber, Marc S.; Ganguli, Mary; Unverzagt, Frederick.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2001, p. 502-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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