Performance of point-of-care diagnostics for glucose, lactate, hemoglobin in the management of severe malaria in a resource-constrained hospital in Uganda

Michael Hawkes, Andrea L. Conroy, Robert O. Opoka, Sophie Namasopo, W. Conrad Liles, Chandy John, Kevin C. Kain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Severe malaria is frequently managed without access to laboratory testing. We report on the performance of point-of-care tests used to guide the management of a cohort of 179 children with severe malaria in a resource-limited Ugandan hospital. Correlation coefficients between paired measurements for glucose (i-STAT and One Touch Ultra), lactate (i-STAT and Lactate Scout), and hemoglobin (Hb; laboratory and i-STAT) were 0.86, 0.85, and 0.73, respectively. The OneTouch Ultra glucometer readings deviated systematically from the i-STAT values by +1.7 mmol/L. Lactate Scout values were systematically higher than i-STAT by +0.86 mmol/L. Lactate measurements from either device predicted subsequent mortality. Hb estimation by the i-STAT instrument was unbiased, with upper and lower limits of agreement of -34 and +34 g/L, and it was 91% sensitive and 89% specific for the diagnosis of severe anemia (Hb <50 g/L). New commercially available bedside diagnostic tools, although imperfect, may expedite clinical decision-making in the management of critically ill children in resource-constrained settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)605-608
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Point-of-Care Systems
Uganda
Malaria
Lactic Acid
Hemoglobins
Glucose
Touch
Critical Illness
Anemia
Reading
Equipment and Supplies
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Performance of point-of-care diagnostics for glucose, lactate, hemoglobin in the management of severe malaria in a resource-constrained hospital in Uganda. / Hawkes, Michael; Conroy, Andrea L.; Opoka, Robert O.; Namasopo, Sophie; Liles, W. Conrad; John, Chandy; Kain, Kevin C.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 90, No. 4, 2014, p. 605-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hawkes, Michael ; Conroy, Andrea L. ; Opoka, Robert O. ; Namasopo, Sophie ; Liles, W. Conrad ; John, Chandy ; Kain, Kevin C. / Performance of point-of-care diagnostics for glucose, lactate, hemoglobin in the management of severe malaria in a resource-constrained hospital in Uganda. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2014 ; Vol. 90, No. 4. pp. 605-608.
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