Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya

S. O. Ayaya, F. O. Esamai, J. Rotich, E. Liechty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the mortality rate and causes of death of all infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery (SCN) of a tertiary referral hospital in rural Kenya. Design: Prospective and Cross-sectional study Setting: Special Care Nursery, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: All infants admitted to the Special Care Nursing (SCN). Main Outcome measures: Survival status at seven postnatal days; major causes of mortality and morbidity. Results: Three hundred and thirty five babies were studied between February and September 1999. Out of these 167(49.9%) were male. There were 50(15%) preterm and 124(37.3%) low birth weight babies. There were 198(76.2%) appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 46(17.7%) small for gestational age and 16(6.2%) large for gestational age babies. The seven day mortality rate of infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery was 66(19.7%). Birth asphyxia and respiratory distress accounted for most deaths. Infants who were admitted primarily because the mother remained under general anesthesia generally did well. Logistic factors, including inadequate training for neonatal resuscitation in ward cadre of staff, unavailability of trained paediatricians and obstetricians, and inadequate operating theatre supplies were all found to delay treatment and likely to increase mortality. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality of infants born at the MTRH remain high. The most common cause of mortality remains birth asphyxia. Some causative factors, such as lack of resources or personnel, are logistic and could be rectified. Antenatal care had a significant positive impact on both morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-561
Number of pages7
JournalEast African medical journal
Volume81
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Fingerprint

Nurseries
Perinatal Mortality
Kenya
Teaching Hospitals
Logistics
Teaching
Referral and Consultation
Resuscitation
Theaters
Nursing
Mortality
Gestational Age
Asphyxia
Personnel
Morbidity
Parturition
Prenatal Care
Infant Mortality
Low Birth Weight Infant
Nursing Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. / Ayaya, S. O.; Esamai, F. O.; Rotich, J.; Liechty, E.

In: East African medical journal, Vol. 81, No. 11, 01.11.2004, p. 555-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ayaya, SO, Esamai, FO, Rotich, J & Liechty, E 2004, 'Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya', East African medical journal, vol. 81, no. 11, pp. 555-561.
Ayaya, S. O. ; Esamai, F. O. ; Rotich, J. ; Liechty, E. / Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. In: East African medical journal. 2004 ; Vol. 81, No. 11. pp. 555-561.
@article{c5f778053d344ad8baef7f91e4f39cb7,
title = "Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya",
abstract = "Objectives: To determine the mortality rate and causes of death of all infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery (SCN) of a tertiary referral hospital in rural Kenya. Design: Prospective and Cross-sectional study Setting: Special Care Nursery, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: All infants admitted to the Special Care Nursing (SCN). Main Outcome measures: Survival status at seven postnatal days; major causes of mortality and morbidity. Results: Three hundred and thirty five babies were studied between February and September 1999. Out of these 167(49.9{\%}) were male. There were 50(15{\%}) preterm and 124(37.3{\%}) low birth weight babies. There were 198(76.2{\%}) appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 46(17.7{\%}) small for gestational age and 16(6.2{\%}) large for gestational age babies. The seven day mortality rate of infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery was 66(19.7{\%}). Birth asphyxia and respiratory distress accounted for most deaths. Infants who were admitted primarily because the mother remained under general anesthesia generally did well. Logistic factors, including inadequate training for neonatal resuscitation in ward cadre of staff, unavailability of trained paediatricians and obstetricians, and inadequate operating theatre supplies were all found to delay treatment and likely to increase mortality. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality of infants born at the MTRH remain high. The most common cause of mortality remains birth asphyxia. Some causative factors, such as lack of resources or personnel, are logistic and could be rectified. Antenatal care had a significant positive impact on both morbidity and mortality.",
author = "Ayaya, {S. O.} and Esamai, {F. O.} and J. Rotich and E. Liechty",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "81",
pages = "555--561",
journal = "East African Medical Journal",
issn = "0012-835X",
publisher = "East African Medical Association",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perinatal mortality in the special care nursery of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya

AU - Ayaya, S. O.

AU - Esamai, F. O.

AU - Rotich, J.

AU - Liechty, E.

PY - 2004/11/1

Y1 - 2004/11/1

N2 - Objectives: To determine the mortality rate and causes of death of all infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery (SCN) of a tertiary referral hospital in rural Kenya. Design: Prospective and Cross-sectional study Setting: Special Care Nursery, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: All infants admitted to the Special Care Nursing (SCN). Main Outcome measures: Survival status at seven postnatal days; major causes of mortality and morbidity. Results: Three hundred and thirty five babies were studied between February and September 1999. Out of these 167(49.9%) were male. There were 50(15%) preterm and 124(37.3%) low birth weight babies. There were 198(76.2%) appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 46(17.7%) small for gestational age and 16(6.2%) large for gestational age babies. The seven day mortality rate of infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery was 66(19.7%). Birth asphyxia and respiratory distress accounted for most deaths. Infants who were admitted primarily because the mother remained under general anesthesia generally did well. Logistic factors, including inadequate training for neonatal resuscitation in ward cadre of staff, unavailability of trained paediatricians and obstetricians, and inadequate operating theatre supplies were all found to delay treatment and likely to increase mortality. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality of infants born at the MTRH remain high. The most common cause of mortality remains birth asphyxia. Some causative factors, such as lack of resources or personnel, are logistic and could be rectified. Antenatal care had a significant positive impact on both morbidity and mortality.

AB - Objectives: To determine the mortality rate and causes of death of all infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery (SCN) of a tertiary referral hospital in rural Kenya. Design: Prospective and Cross-sectional study Setting: Special Care Nursery, Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. Subjects: All infants admitted to the Special Care Nursing (SCN). Main Outcome measures: Survival status at seven postnatal days; major causes of mortality and morbidity. Results: Three hundred and thirty five babies were studied between February and September 1999. Out of these 167(49.9%) were male. There were 50(15%) preterm and 124(37.3%) low birth weight babies. There were 198(76.2%) appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 46(17.7%) small for gestational age and 16(6.2%) large for gestational age babies. The seven day mortality rate of infants admitted to the Special Care Nursery was 66(19.7%). Birth asphyxia and respiratory distress accounted for most deaths. Infants who were admitted primarily because the mother remained under general anesthesia generally did well. Logistic factors, including inadequate training for neonatal resuscitation in ward cadre of staff, unavailability of trained paediatricians and obstetricians, and inadequate operating theatre supplies were all found to delay treatment and likely to increase mortality. Conclusion: Morbidity and mortality of infants born at the MTRH remain high. The most common cause of mortality remains birth asphyxia. Some causative factors, such as lack of resources or personnel, are logistic and could be rectified. Antenatal care had a significant positive impact on both morbidity and mortality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=19844379492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=19844379492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 15868963

AN - SCOPUS:19844379492

VL - 81

SP - 555

EP - 561

JO - East African Medical Journal

JF - East African Medical Journal

SN - 0012-835X

IS - 11

ER -