Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

Amanda L. Blaker, Nicole A. Northrop, Bryan Yamamoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that is widely known to act directly upon the central nervous system (CNS) and to produce damage to the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems and the blood-brain barrier. Additionally, METH acutely increases oxidative stress, glutamate neurotransmission, and neuroinflammation, all of which are known to mediate METH-induced damage in the brain. In addition to the CNS effects, METH can result in detrimental effects in the periphery, but these effects have not been well characterized. However, relatively recent human case studies illustrate that METH affects the lungs, liver, muscle, kidneys, vasculature, and intestinal tract, resulting in organ dysfunction and the release of cytotoxic molecules into the circulation, including inflammatory mediators. This chapter focuses on the peripheral targets of METH and how damage to these organs might contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages309-319
Number of pages11
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9780128003756
ISBN (Print)9780128002124
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Methamphetamine
Central Nervous System
Blood-Brain Barrier
Synaptic Transmission
Glutamic Acid
Oxidative Stress
Kidney
Muscles
Lung
Liver
Brain

Keywords

  • Ammonia
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • Cytokine
  • Dopamine
  • Glutamate
  • Inflammation
  • Methamphetamine
  • Neurotoxicity
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Blaker, A. L., Northrop, N. A., & Yamamoto, B. (2016). Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity. In Stimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects (Vol. 2, pp. 309-319). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800212-4.00030-3

Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity. / Blaker, Amanda L.; Northrop, Nicole A.; Yamamoto, Bryan.

Stimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2016. p. 309-319.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Blaker, AL, Northrop, NA & Yamamoto, B 2016, Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity. in Stimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects. vol. 2, Elsevier Inc., pp. 309-319. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800212-4.00030-3
Blaker AL, Northrop NA, Yamamoto B. Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity. In Stimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects. Vol. 2. Elsevier Inc. 2016. p. 309-319 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800212-4.00030-3
Blaker, Amanda L. ; Northrop, Nicole A. ; Yamamoto, Bryan. / Peripheral Influences of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity. Stimulants, Club and Dissociative Drugs, Hallucinogens, Steroids, Inhalants and International Aspects. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2016. pp. 309-319
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