Pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process for hepatitis C care: A novel model for same-day pretreatment workup

Kelly K. Houck, Amanda P. Ifeachor, Breanne S. Fleming, Audrey M. Andres, Kristin N. O'Donovan, Andrew J. Johnson, Suthat Liangpunsakul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The objective is to describe and quantify the impact of a novel practice model for pharmacist involvement in care coordination and patient education in hepatitis C virus (HCV) care. Setting: This practice model was implemented in the gastroenterology clinic at the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Practice description: Traditional pretreatment workup for HCV requires multiple on-site appointments to complete imaging and laboratory assessments and for provider and social work appointments. High pretreatment time burden and increasing psychosocial complexity of the patient population present significant barriers to HCV eradication. Patients frequently miss appointments, and each on-site visit creates a separate opportunity for patients to be lost to follow-up. Practice innovation: The pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process was launched by HCV pharmacists to mitigate barriers. Patients complete the pretreatment evaluation process, which includes same-day pharmacy education, provider visit, social work assessment, FibroScan, and laboratory assessments, in approximately 2.5 hours. Evaluation: Forty-six patients who completed the pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process versus 235 patients who completed traditional workup were analyzed for time from date of HCV consultation placement to treatment start and time from most recent HCV provider visit to treatment start. Results: From time of HCV consult entry to date of treatment start, patients were initiated on HCV treatment in an average of 42.2 ± 7.5 days and 184.1 ± 27.6 days (P = 0.0001) within the intervention and traditional workup groups, respectively. A decreased time from most recent HCV provider visit to treatment initiation was noted between groups with 38.2 ± 7.1 days and 54.7 ± 3.6 days (P = 0.04) in the intervention and traditional workup groups, respectively. Conclusion: The pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process is an effective way to engage patients and decrease time to treatment initiation. This model could be replicated in other practice settings, especially those challenged by multi-step care coordination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Pharmacists Association
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Hepatitis C
Viruses
Pharmacists
Hepacivirus
Appointments and Schedules
Social Work
Gastroenterology
Therapeutics
Education
Pharmacy Education
Virus Internalization
Lost to Follow-Up
Veterans
Patient Education
Referral and Consultation
Innovation
Imaging techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (nursing)
  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process for hepatitis C care : A novel model for same-day pretreatment workup. / Houck, Kelly K.; Ifeachor, Amanda P.; Fleming, Breanne S.; Andres, Audrey M.; O'Donovan, Kristin N.; Johnson, Andrew J.; Liangpunsakul, Suthat.

In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Houck, Kelly K. ; Ifeachor, Amanda P. ; Fleming, Breanne S. ; Andres, Audrey M. ; O'Donovan, Kristin N. ; Johnson, Andrew J. ; Liangpunsakul, Suthat. / Pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process for hepatitis C care : A novel model for same-day pretreatment workup. In: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. 2019.
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abstract = "Objectives: The objective is to describe and quantify the impact of a novel practice model for pharmacist involvement in care coordination and patient education in hepatitis C virus (HCV) care. Setting: This practice model was implemented in the gastroenterology clinic at the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Practice description: Traditional pretreatment workup for HCV requires multiple on-site appointments to complete imaging and laboratory assessments and for provider and social work appointments. High pretreatment time burden and increasing psychosocial complexity of the patient population present significant barriers to HCV eradication. Patients frequently miss appointments, and each on-site visit creates a separate opportunity for patients to be lost to follow-up. Practice innovation: The pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process was launched by HCV pharmacists to mitigate barriers. Patients complete the pretreatment evaluation process, which includes same-day pharmacy education, provider visit, social work assessment, FibroScan, and laboratory assessments, in approximately 2.5 hours. Evaluation: Forty-six patients who completed the pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process versus 235 patients who completed traditional workup were analyzed for time from date of HCV consultation placement to treatment start and time from most recent HCV provider visit to treatment start. Results: From time of HCV consult entry to date of treatment start, patients were initiated on HCV treatment in an average of 42.2 ± 7.5 days and 184.1 ± 27.6 days (P = 0.0001) within the intervention and traditional workup groups, respectively. A decreased time from most recent HCV provider visit to treatment initiation was noted between groups with 38.2 ± 7.1 days and 54.7 ± 3.6 days (P = 0.04) in the intervention and traditional workup groups, respectively. Conclusion: The pharmacist-driven multidisciplinary pretreatment workup process is an effective way to engage patients and decrease time to treatment initiation. This model could be replicated in other practice settings, especially those challenged by multi-step care coordination.",
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