Pharmacogenetic models of alcoholism.

T. K. Li, W. J. McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article reviews recent efforts in developing laboratory animal models for the study of alcoholism and abnormal alcohol-seeking behavior. Through selective breeding, stable lines of rats that reliably exhibit high and low voluntary alcohol consumption have been raised. The high preference animals self-administer ethanol by free-choice drinking, and operantly for intragastric infusion, in amounts that produce intoxication. With chronic free-choice drinking, the preferring rats develop tolerance and physical dependence. Low to moderate concentrations (50-150 mg%) of ethanol are reinforcing to the preferring rat, as evidenced by intracranial self-administration studies. Compared with nonpreferring animals, they are less affected and develop tolerance more quickly to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol. Neurochemical, -anatomical and -pharmacological studies indicate innate differences between the alcohol-preferring and -nonpreferring lines in the brain limbic structures. Depending on the animal model under study, a change in the main dopaminergic pathway and/or the serotonergic, opioid, and GABAergic systems that regulate this pathway may underlie the vulnerability to the abnormal alcohol-seeking behavior in these pharmacogenetic animal models of alcoholism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-188
Number of pages7
JournalClinical neuroscience (New York, N.Y.)
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Pharmacogenetics
Alcoholism
Ethanol
Animal Models
Alcohols
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Drinking
Self Administration
Alcohol Drinking
Opioid Analgesics
Pharmacology
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Li, T. K., & McBride, W. J. (1995). Pharmacogenetic models of alcoholism. Clinical neuroscience (New York, N.Y.), 3(3), 182-188.

Pharmacogenetic models of alcoholism. / Li, T. K.; McBride, W. J.

In: Clinical neuroscience (New York, N.Y.), Vol. 3, No. 3, 1995, p. 182-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, TK & McBride, WJ 1995, 'Pharmacogenetic models of alcoholism.', Clinical neuroscience (New York, N.Y.), vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 182-188.
Li, T. K. ; McBride, W. J. / Pharmacogenetic models of alcoholism. In: Clinical neuroscience (New York, N.Y.). 1995 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 182-188.
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