Pharmacogenetics and other reasons why drugs can fail in pregnancy: Higher dose or different drug?

David Haas, Mary D'Alton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy can alter the absorption, distribution, and clearance of many drugs. When presented with a clinical situation in which it does not appear that a prescribed drug is working, clinicians must either change drugs or increase the dose of the current drug to achieve the desired clinical effect. A case highlighting antihypertensive medication in pregnancy and the effect of changed drug-metabolizing enzymes is presented. Understanding pregnancy's effect on drug-metabolizing enzymes, transporters, and receptors can help clinicians make individualized pharmacotherapeutic decisions for patients. Pharmacogenetics potentially can aid clinicians in treating pregnant women in the future as more data are generated and individualized therapeutic models are constructed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1176-1179
Number of pages4
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume120
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Pharmacogenetics
Pregnancy
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Enzymes
Antihypertensive Agents
Pregnant Women
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Pharmacogenetics and other reasons why drugs can fail in pregnancy : Higher dose or different drug? / Haas, David; D'Alton, Mary.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 120, No. 5, 11.2012, p. 1176-1179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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