Phase angle shift is a better determinant for catheter electrode contact with tissue compared to a catheter sensed electrogram

Thomas H. Everett IV, Israel Byrd, Emily Wilson, Jamie Skoglund, Jeffrey Olgin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Convention holds that the magnitude of an electrogram (EGM) recorded from an ablation catheter indicates proximity to the tissue and may be used to guide tip placement. The shift in capacitance (phase angle) as the electrode touches the tissue may be a better guide. We compared these two methods over a range of distances in close proximity to heart tissue. This study suggests that EGM is not a reliable predictor of proximity to tissue within a few millimeters of the surface. Thus, EGM alone should not be used to guide electrode placement for ablation, as a millimeter off the surface will shift a greater percentage of delivered energy to the blood pool rather than the target tissue. EGM should also not be used to gauge force of the catheter into tissue. Phase angle is a better predictor of both variables, but an optimal combination of predictors remains to be found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08
Pages1733-1736
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: Aug 20 2008Aug 25 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08 - "Personalized Healthcare through Technology"

Other

Other30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period8/20/088/25/08

Keywords

  • Catheter ablation
  • Electrophysiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

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  • Cite this

    Everett IV, T. H., Byrd, I., Wilson, E., Skoglund, J., & Olgin, J. (2008). Phase angle shift is a better determinant for catheter electrode contact with tissue compared to a catheter sensed electrogram. In Proceedings of the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08 (pp. 1733-1736). [4649511] (Proceedings of the 30th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'08 - "Personalized Healthcare through Technology").