Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption

James C. Fleet, Munro Peacock

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whole body calcium and phosphate metabolisms are controlled by mechanisms at three organs: the intestine where calcium and phosphate enter the body from the diet, the kidney where calcium and phosphate are excreted, and the bone where calcium and phosphate are stored together as apatite crystals and serve both as mineral reservoirs and as structural components that provide strength to bone [1]. The greatest stores of calcium and phosphate reside in bone, but important smaller metabolically active stores are present both outside and inside cells. Although the density and microstructure of bone reflect the availability and utilization of calcium and phosphate in the body, homeostatic mechanisms exist to protect plasma concentrations and not bones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease
PublisherCRC Press
Pages13-40
Number of pages28
ISBN (Electronic)9781439899434
ISBN (Print)9781439899427
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Vitamin D
Bone and Bones
Apatites
Bone Density
Intestines
Minerals
calcium phosphate
Diet
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fleet, J. C., & Peacock, M. (2014). Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption. In The Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease (pp. 13-40). CRC Press.

Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption. / Fleet, James C.; Peacock, Munro.

The Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease. CRC Press, 2014. p. 13-40.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Fleet, JC & Peacock, M 2014, Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption. in The Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease. CRC Press, pp. 13-40.
Fleet JC, Peacock M. Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption. In The Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease. CRC Press. 2014. p. 13-40
Fleet, James C. ; Peacock, Munro. / Physiology of vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate absorption. The Physiological Basis of Metabolic Bone Disease. CRC Press, 2014. pp. 13-40
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