Picture archiving and communications systems in radiation oncology (PACSRO): tools for a physician-based digital image review system

K. P. McGee, I. J. Das, D. A. Fein, E. E. Martin, T. E. Schultheiss, G. E. Hanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Digital imaging is becoming more and more important in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of patients in radiation oncology. In order to facilitate the most efficient interface of this technology to physicians and other users of this information, a medical image display system (MID) has been developed at the Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC). The system runs on 20 personal computers situated in physicians offices as well as a modified system located in the radiation oncology conference room. Access to CT, MRI, and EPID information is achieved through an Ethernet connection to the hospital picture archiving and communications system (PACS). Over a 1-year period a total of 503 patients and 3845 images have been stored on the system. Physician approval using the MID system (without conventional films) was performed on 106 patients. Of these, 22%, 16%, 11%, 10%, and 9% consisted of breast, prostate, pelvic, lung, and head and neck patients, respectively. Digital images sent from a variety of image sources to the MID system take up to 15 s to process and format while image access and display can take 2-5 s, dependent upon image size and speed of the host computer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-62
Number of pages9
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radiology Information Systems
Radiation Oncology
Physicians
Physicians' Offices
Microcomputers
Prostate
Breast
Neck
Head
Technology
Lung
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • CT
  • DRR
  • Image processing
  • Medical image display
  • On-line portal image

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Urology

Cite this

Picture archiving and communications systems in radiation oncology (PACSRO) : tools for a physician-based digital image review system. / McGee, K. P.; Das, I. J.; Fein, D. A.; Martin, E. E.; Schultheiss, T. E.; Hanks, G. E.

In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, Vol. 34, No. 1, 1995, p. 54-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGee, K. P. ; Das, I. J. ; Fein, D. A. ; Martin, E. E. ; Schultheiss, T. E. ; Hanks, G. E. / Picture archiving and communications systems in radiation oncology (PACSRO) : tools for a physician-based digital image review system. In: Radiotherapy and Oncology. 1995 ; Vol. 34, No. 1. pp. 54-62.
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