Post-intensive care unit psychiatric comorbidity and quality of life

Sophia Wang, Chris Mosher, Anthony J. Perkins, Sujuan Gao, Sue Lasiter, Sikandar Khan, Malaz Boustani, Babar Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of psychiatric symptoms ranges from 17% to 44% in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. The relationship between the comorbidity of psychiatric symptoms and quality of life (QoL) in ICU survivors has not been carefully examined. This study examined the relationship between psychiatric comorbidities and QoL in 58 survivors of ICU delirium. Patients completed 3 psychiatric screens at 3 months after discharge from the hospital, including the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) for depression, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) questionnaire for anxiety, and the Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSS- 10) questionnaire for posttraumatic stress disorder. Patients with 3 positive screens (PHQ-9 ≥ 10; GAD-7 ≥ 10; and PTSS-10 > 35) comprised the high psychiatric comorbidity group. Patients with 1 to 2 positive screens were labeled the low to moderate (low-moderate) psychiatric comorbidity group. Patients with 3 negative screens were labeled the no psychiatric morbidity group. Thirty-one percent of patients met the criteria for high psychiatric comorbidity. After adjusting for age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index, discharge status, and prior history of depression and anxiety, patients who had high psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to have a poorer QoL compared with the low-moderate comorbidity and no morbidity groups, as measured by a lower EuroQol 5 dimensions questionnaire 3-level Index (no, 0.69 ±0.25; low-moderate, 0.70 ±0.19; high, 0.48 ±0.24; P = 0.017). Future studies should confirm these findings and examine whether survivors of ICU delirium with high psychiatric comorbidity have different treatment needs from survivors with lower psychiatric comorbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-835
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Intensive Care Units
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Quality of Life
Survivors
Delirium
Anxiety Disorders
Anxiety
Depression
Morbidity
Health
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Post-intensive care unit psychiatric comorbidity and quality of life. / Wang, Sophia; Mosher, Chris; Perkins, Anthony J.; Gao, Sujuan; Lasiter, Sue; Khan, Sikandar; Boustani, Malaz; Khan, Babar.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 831-835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Sophia ; Mosher, Chris ; Perkins, Anthony J. ; Gao, Sujuan ; Lasiter, Sue ; Khan, Sikandar ; Boustani, Malaz ; Khan, Babar. / Post-intensive care unit psychiatric comorbidity and quality of life. In: Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 10. pp. 831-835.
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