Power, sex, and rape myth acceptance: Testing two models of rape proclivity

Kristine M. Chapleau, Debra L. Oswald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Power and sex are thought to be important factors associated with sexual aggression. The goal of this study was to offer a dual-process model to determine how both an implicit power-sex association and explicit power-sex beliefs contribute to rape myth acceptance and rape proclivity. In Study 1, an explicit measure of power-sex beliefs was developed using a participant sample of 131 college students (54% female; age: M=20.2 years, SD=3.5 years). In Study 2, 108 male college students (age: M=19.1 years, SD=1.3 years) completed a power-sex implicit association test and three explicit measures assessing power-sex beliefs, rape myth acceptance, and rape proclivity. Two models of rape proclivity were compared. The best-fitting model showed that rape myth acceptance mediated the relationships between rape proclivity and an implicit power-sex association, as well as explicit power-sex beliefs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-78
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Power, sex, and rape myth acceptance: Testing two models of rape proclivity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this