PowerPoint: Know your medium

Richard Gunderman, Kevin C. McCammack IV

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To make the most of PowerPoint in professional presentations, presenters need to understand some basic principles that transcend the software. These include a thorough grasp of the message a presenter wants to convey; the backgrounds, interests, and needs of the audience; and the best approaches to fitting the medium of delivery to the content of the material. PowerPoint is a useful tool, but like any tool, whether a stethoscope, a scalpel, or a CT scanner, it can be used well or ill. Using it to its full capabilities requires that we regard it less as a crutch that can compensate for our deficiencies and more as a springboard with which to vault our presentations higher. At its best, PowerPoint can serve us just as brushes and pigments serve an artist, but it can never substitute for a fertile imagination and a discerning eye.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)711-714
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

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Crutches
Stethoscopes
Imagination
Hand Strength
Software
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Keywords

  • communication
  • PowerPoint
  • presentations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

PowerPoint : Know your medium. / Gunderman, Richard; McCammack IV, Kevin C.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 7, No. 9, 2010, p. 711-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gunderman, Richard ; McCammack IV, Kevin C. / PowerPoint : Know your medium. In: Journal of the American College of Radiology. 2010 ; Vol. 7, No. 9. pp. 711-714.
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