Pragmatic characteristics of patient-reported outcome measures are important for use in clinical practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Measures for assessing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that may have initially been developed for research are increasingly being recommended for use in clinical practice as well. Although psychometric rigor is essential, this article focuses on pragmatic characteristics of PROs that may enhance uptake into clinical practice. Study Design and Setting Three sources were drawn on in identifying pragmatic criteria for PROs: (1) selected literature review including recommendations by other expert groups; (2) key features of several model public domain PROs; and (3) the authors' experience in developing practical PROs. Results Eight characteristics of a practical PRO include: (1) actionability (i.e., scores guide diagnostic or therapeutic actions/decision making); (2) appropriateness for the relevant clinical setting; (3) universality (i.e., for screening, severity assessment, and monitoring across multiple conditions); (4) self-administration; (5) item features (number of items and bundling issues); (6) response options (option number and dimensions, uniform vs. varying options, time frame, intervals between options); (7) scoring (simplicity and interpretability); and (8) accessibility (nonproprietary, downloadable, available in different languages and for vulnerable groups, and incorporated into electronic health records). Conclusion Balancing psychometric and pragmatic factors in the development of PROs is important for accelerating the incorporation of PROs into clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1085-1092
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume68
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Psychometrics
Self Administration
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Electronic Health Records
Public Sector
Decision Making
Language
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Measures
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Psychometrics
  • Quality of life
  • Scales
  • Utility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Pragmatic characteristics of patient-reported outcome measures are important for use in clinical practice. / Kroenke, Kurt; Monahan, Patrick; Kean, Jacob.

In: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, Vol. 68, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 1085-1092.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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