Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma

Liang Cheng, Roxann M. Neumann, Amy L. Weaver, Bruce E. Spotts, David G. Bostwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A significant number of patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma are at risk for cancer progression. We sought to identify factors associated with cancer progression in a series of patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma treated with a contemporary therapeutic approach. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 83 consecutive patients in whom stage T1 bladder carcinoma was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic between 1987 and 1992. All patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) and had histologic confirmation of the diagnosis. The mean age was 71 years (range, 47 to 94 years). The male-to-female ratio was 3.9:1. The mean length of follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1 day to 10.4 years). The depth of lamina propria invasion in the TURB specimens was measured with an ocular micrometer. Cancer progression was defined as the development of muscle- invasive or more advanced stage carcinoma, distant metastasis, or death from bladder cancer. Results: The overall 5- and 7-year progression. Free survival rates were 82% and 80%, respectively. The depth of invasion in the TURB specimens was associated with cancer progression (hazards ratio, 1.6 for doubling of depth of invasion; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.4; P = .037). The 5-year progression-free survival rate for patients with depth of invasion of ≥ 1.5 mm was 67%, compared with 93% for those with depth of invasion of less than 1.5 mm (P = .009). No other variable, including age, sex, tobacco use, alcohol use, the presence of carcinoma-in-situ, histologic grade, lymphocytic infiltration, or muscularis mucosae invasion, was associated with cancer progression. Conclusion: The depth of invasion in the TURB specimens, measured with a micrometer, is predictive of cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3182-3187
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume17
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1999

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Urinary Bladder
Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Mucous Membrane
Survival Rate
Muscle Development
Carcinoma in Situ
Tobacco Use
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Disease-Free Survival
Alcohols
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasm Metastasis
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cheng, L., Neumann, R. M., Weaver, A. L., Spotts, B. E., & Bostwick, D. G. (1999). Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 17(10), 3182-3187.

Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma. / Cheng, Liang; Neumann, Roxann M.; Weaver, Amy L.; Spotts, Bruce E.; Bostwick, David G.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 17, No. 10, 10.1999, p. 3182-3187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, L, Neumann, RM, Weaver, AL, Spotts, BE & Bostwick, DG 1999, 'Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 3182-3187.
Cheng L, Neumann RM, Weaver AL, Spotts BE, Bostwick DG. Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1999 Oct;17(10):3182-3187.
Cheng, Liang ; Neumann, Roxann M. ; Weaver, Amy L. ; Spotts, Bruce E. ; Bostwick, David G. / Predicting cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1999 ; Vol. 17, No. 10. pp. 3182-3187.
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abstract = "Purpose: A significant number of patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma are at risk for cancer progression. We sought to identify factors associated with cancer progression in a series of patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma treated with a contemporary therapeutic approach. Patients and Methods: The study population consisted of 83 consecutive patients in whom stage T1 bladder carcinoma was diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic between 1987 and 1992. All patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) and had histologic confirmation of the diagnosis. The mean age was 71 years (range, 47 to 94 years). The male-to-female ratio was 3.9:1. The mean length of follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1 day to 10.4 years). The depth of lamina propria invasion in the TURB specimens was measured with an ocular micrometer. Cancer progression was defined as the development of muscle- invasive or more advanced stage carcinoma, distant metastasis, or death from bladder cancer. Results: The overall 5- and 7-year progression. Free survival rates were 82{\%} and 80{\%}, respectively. The depth of invasion in the TURB specimens was associated with cancer progression (hazards ratio, 1.6 for doubling of depth of invasion; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.4; P = .037). The 5-year progression-free survival rate for patients with depth of invasion of ≥ 1.5 mm was 67{\%}, compared with 93{\%} for those with depth of invasion of less than 1.5 mm (P = .009). No other variable, including age, sex, tobacco use, alcohol use, the presence of carcinoma-in-situ, histologic grade, lymphocytic infiltration, or muscularis mucosae invasion, was associated with cancer progression. Conclusion: The depth of invasion in the TURB specimens, measured with a micrometer, is predictive of cancer progression in patients with stage T1 bladder carcinoma.",
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