Predictors of Preference for Hospice Care Among Diverse Older Adults

John G. Cagle, Michael A. LaMantia, Sharon W. Williams, Jolynn Pek, Lloyd J. Edwards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of preference for hospice care and explore whether the effect of these predictors on preference for hospice care were moderated by race. Methods: An analysis of the North Carolina AARP End of Life Survey (N = 3035) was conducted using multinomial logistic modeling to identify predictors of preference for hospice care. Response options included yes, no, or don’t know. Results: Fewer black respondents reported a preference for hospice (63.8% vs 79.2% for white respondents, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-584
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Hospice Care
Hospices
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • disparities
  • hospice
  • older adults
  • survey research
  • treatment preferences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Predictors of Preference for Hospice Care Among Diverse Older Adults. / Cagle, John G.; LaMantia, Michael A.; Williams, Sharon W.; Pek, Jolynn; Edwards, Lloyd J.

In: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.07.2016, p. 574-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cagle, John G. ; LaMantia, Michael A. ; Williams, Sharon W. ; Pek, Jolynn ; Edwards, Lloyd J. / Predictors of Preference for Hospice Care Among Diverse Older Adults. In: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 574-584.
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