Pregnancy disorders appear to modify the risk for retinopathy of prematurity associated with neonatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia

Jennifer W. Lee, Thomas McElrath, Minghua Chen, David K. Wallace, Elizabeth N. Allred, Alan Leviton, Olaf Dammann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To explore (1) whether extremely low gestational age newborns exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders differ in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) risk from infants exposed to placenta dysfunction-associated disorders, and (2) whether ROP risk associated with postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia differs among infants exposed to these disorders. Methods: Pregnancy disorders resulting in preterm birth include inflammation-associated: preterm labor, prelabor premature rupture of membranes (pPROM), cervical insufficiency, and abruption and placenta dysfunction-associated: preeclampsia and fetal indication. The risk of severe ROP associated with pregnancy disorders was evaluated by multivariable analyses in strata defined by potential effect modifiers, postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia. Results: Compared to preterm labor, infants delivered after pPROM were at reduced risk of plus disease (Odds ratio=0.4, 95% confidence interval: 0.2-0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.5, 0.3-0.8). Infants delivered after abruption had reduced risk of zone I ROP (0.2, 0.1-0.8) and prethreshold/threshold ROP (0.3, 0.1-0.7). In stratified analyses, infants born after placenta dysfunction had higher risks of severe ROP associated with subsequent postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia than infants born after inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders. Conclusion: Infants exposed to placenta dysfunction have an increased risk of severe ROP following postnatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia compared to infants exposed to inflammation-associated pregnancy disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)811-818
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retinopathy of Prematurity
Bacteremia
Pregnancy
Placenta
Inflammation
Premature Obstetric Labor
Rupture
Membranes
Premature Birth
Pre-Eclampsia
Premature Infants
Gestational Age
Odds Ratio
Newborn Infant
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Bacteremia
  • ELGAN
  • Hyperoxemia
  • Pregnancy
  • Retinopathy of prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Pregnancy disorders appear to modify the risk for retinopathy of prematurity associated with neonatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia. / Lee, Jennifer W.; McElrath, Thomas; Chen, Minghua; Wallace, David K.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan; Dammann, Olaf.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 26, No. 8, 01.05.2013, p. 811-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Jennifer W. ; McElrath, Thomas ; Chen, Minghua ; Wallace, David K. ; Allred, Elizabeth N. ; Leviton, Alan ; Dammann, Olaf. / Pregnancy disorders appear to modify the risk for retinopathy of prematurity associated with neonatal hyperoxemia and bacteremia. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 26, No. 8. pp. 811-818.
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