Prematurity and respiratory outcomes program (PROP): Study protocol of a prospective multicenter study of respiratory outcomes of preterm infants in the United States

The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: With improved survival rates, short- and long-term respiratory complications of premature birth are increasing, adding significantly to financial and health burdens in the United States. In response, in May 2010, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded a 5-year $18.5 million research initiative to ultimately improve strategies for managing the respiratory complications of preterm and low birth weight infants. Using a collaborative, multi-disciplinary structure, the resulting Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) seeks to understand factors that correlate with future risk for respiratory morbidity. Methods/Design: The PROP is an observational prospective cohort study performed by a consortium of six clinical centers (incorporating tertiary neonatal intensive care units [NICU] at 13 sites) and a data-coordinating center working in collaboration with the NHLBI. Each clinical center contributes subjects to the study, enrolling infants with gestational ages 23 0/7 to 28 6/7 weeks with an anticipated target of 750 survivors at 36 weeks post-menstrual age. In addition, each center brings specific areas of scientific focus to the Program. The primary study hypothesis is that in survivors of extreme prematurity specific biologic, physiologic and clinical data predicts respiratory morbidity between discharge and 1 year corrected age. Analytic statistical methodology includes model-based and non-model-based analyses, descriptive analyses and generalized linear mixed models. Discussion: PROP incorporates aspects of NICU care to develop objective biomarkers and outcome measures of respiratory morbidity in the <29 week gestation population beyond just the NICU hospitalization, thereby leading to novel understanding of the nature and natural history of neonatal lung disease and of potential mechanistic and therapeutic targets in at-risk subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Article number37
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2015

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Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Infants
Multicenter Studies
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Premature Birth
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Morbidity
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Survivors
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Low Birth Weight Infant
Lung Diseases
Gestational Age
Linear Models
Hospitalization
Cohort Studies
Survival Rate
Biomarkers
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Infant
  • Prematurity
  • Preterm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prematurity and respiratory outcomes program (PROP) : Study protocol of a prospective multicenter study of respiratory outcomes of preterm infants in the United States. / The Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program Investigators.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 37, 10.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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