Prescribing pattern of antibacterial drugs in a teaching hospital in Gondar, Ethiopia

A. Aseffa, Zeruesenay Desta, I. Tadesse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prescribing pattern of antibacterial agents was analyzed by reviewing case notes of 407 patients discharged between October and November 1992 from a teaching hospital in Gondar, North-West Ethiopia. Seventy percent had received one or more antibacterials. Most exposure was in surgical ward (84%) followed by paediatric (82%), orthopaedic (78%), medical (72%), gynaecologic (58%) and obstetric (20%) wards. The antibacterials most frequently prescribed were penicillin G (25%), chloramphenicol (24%), and ampicillin (20%). The total list numbered 13 and included no cephalosporines or quinoline derivatives. The preliminary survey indicated an inappropriate use of antibacterials and suggested the need to develop a policy on hospital antibacterial use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-59
Number of pages4
JournalEast African Medical Journal
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ethiopia
Penicillin G
Chloramphenicol
Ampicillin
Teaching Hospitals
Obstetrics
Orthopedics
Teaching
Pediatrics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Derivatives
Surveys and Questionnaires
quinoline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Prescribing pattern of antibacterial drugs in a teaching hospital in Gondar, Ethiopia. / Aseffa, A.; Desta, Zeruesenay; Tadesse, I.

In: East African Medical Journal, Vol. 72, No. 1, 1995, p. 56-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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