Prevalence and incidence of urinary incontinence in a diverse population of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions

Jennifer M. Wu, Sandra Stinnett, Rebecca A. Jackson, Alison Jacoby, Lee A. Learman, Miriam Kuppermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence and the incidence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a diverse cohort of women presenting with noncancerous gynecologic conditions and to assess factors associated with UI prevalence and incidence. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives, a longitudinal study of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions (bleeding, pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids). Urinary incontinence was defined as incontinence in the last 4 weeks as reported on intervieweradministered annual questionnaires. We also evaluated the types of UI: stress, urge or mixed incontinence. Results: The study population of 907 women was composed of 40.8% white, 28.0% African American, 17.3% Latina and 8.1% Asian. The mean age was 44.1 (5.4) years and 48.5% had an annual household income of ≤$50,000. The overall prevalence of any UI was 51.1%. At baseline, stress UI was the most common at 39.4% followed by urge UI at 23.7% and mixed UI at 18.9%. The average annual incidence for any UI was 4.2%. Thirteen percent of the women who underwent hysterectomy developed incident UI after their surgery. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, prevalent UI was associated with the following: age in decades (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.2), Latina race/ethnicity compared to white (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.3), and parity (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). None of the factors evaluated were associated with incidence of UI. Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is very common in women seeking care for noncancerous gynecologic conditions, particularly among older, parous Latinas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)284-289
Number of pages6
JournalFemale Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Incontinence
Incidence
Population
Hispanic Americans
Urge Urinary Incontinence
Stress Urinary Incontinence
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hysterectomy
Pelvic Pain
Leiomyoma
Parity
African Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Incidence
  • Prevalence
  • Urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Surgery
  • Urology

Cite this

Prevalence and incidence of urinary incontinence in a diverse population of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions. / Wu, Jennifer M.; Stinnett, Sandra; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Jacoby, Alison; Learman, Lee A.; Kuppermann, Miriam.

In: Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 16, No. 5, 2010, p. 284-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Jennifer M. ; Stinnett, Sandra ; Jackson, Rebecca A. ; Jacoby, Alison ; Learman, Lee A. ; Kuppermann, Miriam. / Prevalence and incidence of urinary incontinence in a diverse population of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions. In: Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 284-289.
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T1 - Prevalence and incidence of urinary incontinence in a diverse population of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions

AU - Wu, Jennifer M.

AU - Stinnett, Sandra

AU - Jackson, Rebecca A.

AU - Jacoby, Alison

AU - Learman, Lee A.

AU - Kuppermann, Miriam

PY - 2010

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N2 - Objectives: To determine the prevalence and the incidence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a diverse cohort of women presenting with noncancerous gynecologic conditions and to assess factors associated with UI prevalence and incidence. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives, a longitudinal study of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions (bleeding, pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids). Urinary incontinence was defined as incontinence in the last 4 weeks as reported on intervieweradministered annual questionnaires. We also evaluated the types of UI: stress, urge or mixed incontinence. Results: The study population of 907 women was composed of 40.8% white, 28.0% African American, 17.3% Latina and 8.1% Asian. The mean age was 44.1 (5.4) years and 48.5% had an annual household income of ≤$50,000. The overall prevalence of any UI was 51.1%. At baseline, stress UI was the most common at 39.4% followed by urge UI at 23.7% and mixed UI at 18.9%. The average annual incidence for any UI was 4.2%. Thirteen percent of the women who underwent hysterectomy developed incident UI after their surgery. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, prevalent UI was associated with the following: age in decades (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.2), Latina race/ethnicity compared to white (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.3), and parity (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). None of the factors evaluated were associated with incidence of UI. Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is very common in women seeking care for noncancerous gynecologic conditions, particularly among older, parous Latinas.

AB - Objectives: To determine the prevalence and the incidence of urinary incontinence (UI) in a diverse cohort of women presenting with noncancerous gynecologic conditions and to assess factors associated with UI prevalence and incidence. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives, a longitudinal study of women with noncancerous gynecologic conditions (bleeding, pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids). Urinary incontinence was defined as incontinence in the last 4 weeks as reported on intervieweradministered annual questionnaires. We also evaluated the types of UI: stress, urge or mixed incontinence. Results: The study population of 907 women was composed of 40.8% white, 28.0% African American, 17.3% Latina and 8.1% Asian. The mean age was 44.1 (5.4) years and 48.5% had an annual household income of ≤$50,000. The overall prevalence of any UI was 51.1%. At baseline, stress UI was the most common at 39.4% followed by urge UI at 23.7% and mixed UI at 18.9%. The average annual incidence for any UI was 4.2%. Thirteen percent of the women who underwent hysterectomy developed incident UI after their surgery. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, prevalent UI was associated with the following: age in decades (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.2), Latina race/ethnicity compared to white (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.3), and parity (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). None of the factors evaluated were associated with incidence of UI. Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is very common in women seeking care for noncancerous gynecologic conditions, particularly among older, parous Latinas.

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KW - Incidence

KW - Prevalence

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