Production of delayed death and neoplastic transformation in CGL1 cells by radiation-induced bystander effects

D. A. Lewis, B. M. Mayhugh, Y. Qin, K. Trott, Marc Mendonca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Other investigators have demonstrated by transfer of medium from irradiated cells and by irradiation with low-fluence α particles or microbeams that cells do not have to be directly exposed to ionizing radiation to be detrimentally affected, i.e. bystander effects. In this study, we demonstrate by transfer of medium from X-irradiated human CGL1 hybrid cells that the killing of bystander cells reduces the plating efficiency of the nonirradiated CGL1 cells by 33 ± 6%. In addition, we show that the amount of cell death induced by bystander effects is not dependent on X-ray dose, and that the induction of apoptosis does not appear to be responsible for the cell death. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in plating efficiency in bystander cells is evident for over 18 days, or 22 cell population doublings, after medium transfer, despite repeated refeeding of the cell cultures. Finally, we report the novel observation that bystander effects induced by the transfer of medium from irradiated cells can induce neoplastic transformation. Exposing unirradiated CGL1 cells to medium from cells irradiated with 5 or 7 Gy increased the frequency of neoplastic transformation significantly from 6.3 × 10-6 in unirradiated controls to 2.3 × 10-5 (a factor of nearly four). We conclude that the bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes in the progeny of CGL1 cells that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. The data suggest that neoplastic transformation in bystander cells may play a significant role in radiation-induced neoplastic transformation at lower doses of X rays.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalRadiation Research
Volume156
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Bystander Effect
death
Radiation
radiation
cells
plating
cell death
dosage
progeny
X-radiation
microbeams
neoplastic cell transformation
Cell Death
apoptosis
X-Rays
ionizing radiation
Hybrid Cells
refeeding
induction
fluence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biophysics
  • Radiation

Cite this

Production of delayed death and neoplastic transformation in CGL1 cells by radiation-induced bystander effects. / Lewis, D. A.; Mayhugh, B. M.; Qin, Y.; Trott, K.; Mendonca, Marc.

In: Radiation Research, Vol. 156, No. 3, 2001, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lewis, D. A. ; Mayhugh, B. M. ; Qin, Y. ; Trott, K. ; Mendonca, Marc. / Production of delayed death and neoplastic transformation in CGL1 cells by radiation-induced bystander effects. In: Radiation Research. 2001 ; Vol. 156, No. 3. pp. 251-258.
@article{8c77b302e7a94f2abf3e3991f71f2053,
title = "Production of delayed death and neoplastic transformation in CGL1 cells by radiation-induced bystander effects",
abstract = "Other investigators have demonstrated by transfer of medium from irradiated cells and by irradiation with low-fluence α particles or microbeams that cells do not have to be directly exposed to ionizing radiation to be detrimentally affected, i.e. bystander effects. In this study, we demonstrate by transfer of medium from X-irradiated human CGL1 hybrid cells that the killing of bystander cells reduces the plating efficiency of the nonirradiated CGL1 cells by 33 ± 6{\%}. In addition, we show that the amount of cell death induced by bystander effects is not dependent on X-ray dose, and that the induction of apoptosis does not appear to be responsible for the cell death. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in plating efficiency in bystander cells is evident for over 18 days, or 22 cell population doublings, after medium transfer, despite repeated refeeding of the cell cultures. Finally, we report the novel observation that bystander effects induced by the transfer of medium from irradiated cells can induce neoplastic transformation. Exposing unirradiated CGL1 cells to medium from cells irradiated with 5 or 7 Gy increased the frequency of neoplastic transformation significantly from 6.3 × 10-6 in unirradiated controls to 2.3 × 10-5 (a factor of nearly four). We conclude that the bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes in the progeny of CGL1 cells that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. The data suggest that neoplastic transformation in bystander cells may play a significant role in radiation-induced neoplastic transformation at lower doses of X rays.",
author = "Lewis, {D. A.} and Mayhugh, {B. M.} and Y. Qin and K. Trott and Marc Mendonca",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "156",
pages = "251--258",
journal = "Radiation Research",
issn = "0033-7587",
publisher = "Radiation Research Society",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Production of delayed death and neoplastic transformation in CGL1 cells by radiation-induced bystander effects

AU - Lewis, D. A.

AU - Mayhugh, B. M.

AU - Qin, Y.

AU - Trott, K.

AU - Mendonca, Marc

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Other investigators have demonstrated by transfer of medium from irradiated cells and by irradiation with low-fluence α particles or microbeams that cells do not have to be directly exposed to ionizing radiation to be detrimentally affected, i.e. bystander effects. In this study, we demonstrate by transfer of medium from X-irradiated human CGL1 hybrid cells that the killing of bystander cells reduces the plating efficiency of the nonirradiated CGL1 cells by 33 ± 6%. In addition, we show that the amount of cell death induced by bystander effects is not dependent on X-ray dose, and that the induction of apoptosis does not appear to be responsible for the cell death. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in plating efficiency in bystander cells is evident for over 18 days, or 22 cell population doublings, after medium transfer, despite repeated refeeding of the cell cultures. Finally, we report the novel observation that bystander effects induced by the transfer of medium from irradiated cells can induce neoplastic transformation. Exposing unirradiated CGL1 cells to medium from cells irradiated with 5 or 7 Gy increased the frequency of neoplastic transformation significantly from 6.3 × 10-6 in unirradiated controls to 2.3 × 10-5 (a factor of nearly four). We conclude that the bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes in the progeny of CGL1 cells that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. The data suggest that neoplastic transformation in bystander cells may play a significant role in radiation-induced neoplastic transformation at lower doses of X rays.

AB - Other investigators have demonstrated by transfer of medium from irradiated cells and by irradiation with low-fluence α particles or microbeams that cells do not have to be directly exposed to ionizing radiation to be detrimentally affected, i.e. bystander effects. In this study, we demonstrate by transfer of medium from X-irradiated human CGL1 hybrid cells that the killing of bystander cells reduces the plating efficiency of the nonirradiated CGL1 cells by 33 ± 6%. In addition, we show that the amount of cell death induced by bystander effects is not dependent on X-ray dose, and that the induction of apoptosis does not appear to be responsible for the cell death. Furthermore, we found that the reduction in plating efficiency in bystander cells is evident for over 18 days, or 22 cell population doublings, after medium transfer, despite repeated refeeding of the cell cultures. Finally, we report the novel observation that bystander effects induced by the transfer of medium from irradiated cells can induce neoplastic transformation. Exposing unirradiated CGL1 cells to medium from cells irradiated with 5 or 7 Gy increased the frequency of neoplastic transformation significantly from 6.3 × 10-6 in unirradiated controls to 2.3 × 10-5 (a factor of nearly four). We conclude that the bystander effect induces persistent, long-term, transmissible changes in the progeny of CGL1 cells that result in delayed death and neoplastic transformation. The data suggest that neoplastic transformation in bystander cells may play a significant role in radiation-induced neoplastic transformation at lower doses of X rays.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034862832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034862832&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 156

SP - 251

EP - 258

JO - Radiation Research

JF - Radiation Research

SN - 0033-7587

IS - 3

ER -