Production of retroviral vectors for clinical use.

Kenneth Cornetta, Lilith Reeves, Scott Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Retroviral vectors were the first viral vectors to enter clinical trials and continue to be attractive candidates for applications where integration of the transgene is required. While these vectors are versatile and are used widely in the research setting, large-scale production for human use poses various challenges to insure quality and high titer. Our vector production facility has produced and certified over 20 vectors for clinical use and continues to be challenged to adapt the ever-changing vector technology to a method of production that complies with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). We describe two manufacturing methods for producing material for Phase I/II clinical trials and suggest ways for investigators to adapt these methods for multiple applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-32
Number of pages16
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume433
StatePublished - 2008

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Phase II Clinical Trials
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Transgenes
Research Personnel
Clinical Trials
Technology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Production of retroviral vectors for clinical use. / Cornetta, Kenneth; Reeves, Lilith; Cross, Scott.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 433, 2008, p. 17-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cornetta, K, Reeves, L & Cross, S 2008, 'Production of retroviral vectors for clinical use.', Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 433, pp. 17-32.
Cornetta, Kenneth ; Reeves, Lilith ; Cross, Scott. / Production of retroviral vectors for clinical use. In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2008 ; Vol. 433. pp. 17-32.
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