Progress in the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Giant cell tumor of bone is a locally aggressive, usually benign bone neoplasm that occurs most commonly in the distal femur and proximal tibia in young adults. The diagnosis is usually not difficult; typical radiographic features include an eccentric radiolucent lesion with a narrow zone of transition and a nonsclerotic margin with a juxta-articular location. Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the behavior of this neoplasm. Whereas surgical margins are important for local tumor control, wide margins achieved with a surgical resection are not necessary for most patients. Thorough curettage and the use of polymethylmethacrylate as a filling material have reduced the rates of local recurrence from 50 to 60% to less than 15%. The benefit of other physical adjuvants such as phenol and liquid nitrogen in achieving local control is controversial. Pulmonary metastases of benign giant cell tumors of bone occur in approximately 2% to 3% of patients. Continued surveillance of these patients with plain radiographs after treatment is necessary for early detection of local recurrence and pulmonary metastases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-480
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Orthopaedics
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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Giant Cell Tumor of Bone
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Bone Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Lung
Curettage
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Phenol
Tibia
Femur
Young Adult
Nitrogen
Therapeutics
Joints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Progress in the treatment of giant cell tumor of bone. / Wurtz, Lawrence.

In: Current Opinion in Orthopaedics, Vol. 10, No. 6, 1999, p. 474-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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