Progress toward a voluntary oral consumption model of alcoholism

T. K. Li, L. Lumeng, W. J. McBride, M. B. Waller, T. D. Hawkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With the goal of obtaining a suitable animal model for voluntary oral consumption of ethanol, the investigators selectively bred lines of alcohol-preferring and alcohol-nonpreferring rats, with preference considered as a function of the concentration of ethanol ingested. Studies with these animals showed that drinking is voluntary and not contingent on caloric restriction; that they will work to obtain ethanol even when food and water are freely available, and in so doing, show psychological or behavioral tolerance; that the amount of ethanol voluntarily consumed approaches their apparent maximum capacity for ethanol elimination. This amount of ethanol was capable of altering brain neurotransmitter content, thus exerting a CNS pharmocologic effect. In addition, the rats will bar-press for intravenous administration of ethanol, and with prolonged, free-choice consumption, ethanol intake increases to as much as 12 g per kg body weight per day without producing behavioral deficits, suggesting the development of tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume4
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1979

Fingerprint

alcoholism
Alcoholism
tolerance
Ethanol
animal
alcohol
body weight
brain
deficit
food
water
Rats
Animals
Alcohols
Caloric Restriction
Intravenous Administration
Drinking
Neurotransmitter Agents
Brain
Animal Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Li, T. K., Lumeng, L., McBride, W. J., Waller, M. B., & Hawkins, T. D. (1979). Progress toward a voluntary oral consumption model of alcoholism. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 4(1-2). https://doi.org/10.1016/0376-8716(79)90040-1

Progress toward a voluntary oral consumption model of alcoholism. / Li, T. K.; Lumeng, L.; McBride, W. J.; Waller, M. B.; Hawkins, T. D.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 4, No. 1-2, 1979.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, T. K. ; Lumeng, L. ; McBride, W. J. ; Waller, M. B. ; Hawkins, T. D. / Progress toward a voluntary oral consumption model of alcoholism. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 1979 ; Vol. 4, No. 1-2.
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