Prolongation of the Q-T interval in man during sleep

Kevin F. Browne, Eric Prystowsky, James J. Heger, Donald A. Chilson, Douglas P. Zipes

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Abstract

Parasympathetic blockade shortens the duration of the Q-T interval and ventricular effective refractory period independent of heart rate change. Since relative parasympathetic effect increases during sleep, it was determined whether sleep was associated with a change in the Q-T interval. Fifteen patients receiving no drugs underwent 3 to 6 days of continuous electrocardiographic recordings. Tracings were sampled every 30 minutes and recorded at a paper speed of 25 mm/s. This provided 12,000 Q-T and R-R intervals that were measured. Comparison of R-R intervals that had similar durations during sleep and awake states revealed that the duration of the Q-T interval was longer during sleep in all 15 patients (p < 0.001). Eight patients had sufficient range of overlap of R-R intervals to compare linear regression lines of Q-T intervals recorded while awake with Q-T intervals recorded while asleep. The regression lines during sleep exhibited a mean intercept change of 38 ± 37 ms and mean slope change of -0.021 ± 0.040 ms when compared with the regression lines during the awake state. The difference in Q-T interval between awake and sleep states was 19 ± 7 ms when calculated at a heart rate of 60 beats/min. These statistical comparisons of the relationship of the Q-T interval to R-R interval indicate that the Q-T interval is longer during sleep than during the awake state at the same heart rate. Prolongation of the Q-T interval during sleep may reflect increased vagal tone or sympathetic withdrawal. These changes in repolarization may be related to the diurnal variation of some ventricular arrhythmias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-59
Number of pages5
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

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Sleep
Heart Rate
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Linear Models
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Browne, K. F., Prystowsky, E., Heger, J. J., Chilson, D. A., & Zipes, D. P. (1983). Prolongation of the Q-T interval in man during sleep. The American Journal of Cardiology, 52(1), 55-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9149(83)90068-1

Prolongation of the Q-T interval in man during sleep. / Browne, Kevin F.; Prystowsky, Eric; Heger, James J.; Chilson, Donald A.; Zipes, Douglas P.

In: The American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 52, No. 1, 1983, p. 55-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Browne, KF, Prystowsky, E, Heger, JJ, Chilson, DA & Zipes, DP 1983, 'Prolongation of the Q-T interval in man during sleep', The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 55-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/0002-9149(83)90068-1
Browne, Kevin F. ; Prystowsky, Eric ; Heger, James J. ; Chilson, Donald A. ; Zipes, Douglas P. / Prolongation of the Q-T interval in man during sleep. In: The American Journal of Cardiology. 1983 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 55-59.
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