Protein and energy requirements in preterm infants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although protein and energy requirements in healthy growing and enterally fed infants are relatively well established, the nutritional requirements of extremely low birth weight infants are considerably less certain. New and emerging data in ELBW infants suggest high rates of energy expenditure and protein losses, which results in significant nutritional deficits and high rates of growth failure. Based on the limited and incomplete available data, energy intakes of 125-130 kcal/kg/d and protein intakes of 3.5-4 g/kg/d appear to be necessary to produce normal growth in ELBW infants. Although these intakes may be difficult to achieve in clinical practice, there is clear evidence that aggressive early nutrition can improve growth outcomes in these infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-382
Number of pages6
JournalSeminars in Neonatology
Volume6
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
Proteins
Growth
Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant
Nutritional Requirements
Energy Intake
Energy Metabolism

Keywords

  • Energy expenditure
  • Nutritional requirements
  • Premature infants
  • Protein balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Protein and energy requirements in preterm infants. / Denne, S. C.

In: Seminars in Neonatology, Vol. 6, No. 5, 01.01.2001, p. 377-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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