Providers’ Access of Imaging Versus Only Reports

A System Log File Analysis

Hye Young Jung, Judy Wawira Gichoya, Joshua Vest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background An increasing number of technologies allow providers to access the results of imaging studies. This study examined differences in access of radiology images compared with text-only reports through a health information exchange system by health care professionals. Methods The study sample included 157,256 historical sessions from a health information exchange system that enabled 1,670 physicians and non-physicians to access text-based reports and imaging over the period 2013 to 2014. The primary outcome was an indicator of access of an imaging study instead of access of a text-only report. Multilevel mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the association between provider and session characteristics and access of images compared with text-only reports. Results Compared with primary care physicians, specialists had an 18% higher probability of accessing actual images instead of text-only reports (β = 0.18; P < .001). Compared with primary care practice settings, the probability of accessing images was 4% higher for specialty care practices (P < .05) and 8% lower for emergency departments (P < .05). Radiologists, orthopedists, and neurologists accounted for 79% of all the sessions with actual images accessed. Orthopedists, radiologists, surgeons, and pulmonary disease specialists accessed imaging more often than text-based reports only. Conclusions Consideration for differences in the need to access images compared with text-only reports based on the type of provider and setting of care are needed to maximize the benefits of image sharing for patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-223
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

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Health Information Systems
Primary Care Physicians
Radiology
Lung Diseases
Hospital Emergency Service
Primary Health Care
Patient Care
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Orthopedic Surgeons
Radiologists
Health Information Exchange
Neurologists
Surgeons

Keywords

  • computer-assisted
  • Health information technology
  • medical specialty
  • nursing
  • radiographic image interpretation
  • radiology
  • radiology information systems/classification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Providers’ Access of Imaging Versus Only Reports : A System Log File Analysis. / Jung, Hye Young; Gichoya, Judy Wawira; Vest, Joshua.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2017, p. 217-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background An increasing number of technologies allow providers to access the results of imaging studies. This study examined differences in access of radiology images compared with text-only reports through a health information exchange system by health care professionals. Methods The study sample included 157,256 historical sessions from a health information exchange system that enabled 1,670 physicians and non-physicians to access text-based reports and imaging over the period 2013 to 2014. The primary outcome was an indicator of access of an imaging study instead of access of a text-only report. Multilevel mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the association between provider and session characteristics and access of images compared with text-only reports. Results Compared with primary care physicians, specialists had an 18{\%} higher probability of accessing actual images instead of text-only reports (β = 0.18; P < .001). Compared with primary care practice settings, the probability of accessing images was 4{\%} higher for specialty care practices (P < .05) and 8{\%} lower for emergency departments (P < .05). Radiologists, orthopedists, and neurologists accounted for 79{\%} of all the sessions with actual images accessed. Orthopedists, radiologists, surgeons, and pulmonary disease specialists accessed imaging more often than text-based reports only. Conclusions Consideration for differences in the need to access images compared with text-only reports based on the type of provider and setting of care are needed to maximize the benefits of image sharing for patient care.",
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