Providers’ Behaviors and Beliefs on Prescribing Antipsychotic Medication to Children: A Qualitative Study

W. David Lohr, Kyle B. Brothers, Deborah Winders Davis, Carla A. Rich, Lesa Ryan, Michael Smith, Michelle Stevenson, Yana Feygin, Charles Woods, John Myers, Gilbert C. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fragmentation in behavioral and mental health care to children has resulted in suboptimal care and high rates of psychotropic medication use, especially antipsychotic medications (APM). A qualitative study, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), aimed to better understand prescribing practices, barriers to optimal treatment, and potential interventions to safeguard the use of APM for children in Kentucky. The most common barrier to optimal care was access to mental health specialists. Social norms and pressure from families contribute to increased medication use. We identify promising interventions to safeguard the use of APM through the lens of the TPB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 31 2017

Keywords

  • Antipsychotic medications
  • Childhood
  • Qualitative methods
  • Theory of Planned Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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    Lohr, W. D., Brothers, K. B., Davis, D. W., Rich, C. A., Ryan, L., Smith, M., Stevenson, M., Feygin, Y., Woods, C., Myers, J., & Liu, G. C. (Accepted/In press). Providers’ Behaviors and Beliefs on Prescribing Antipsychotic Medication to Children: A Qualitative Study. Community Mental Health Journal, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10597-017-0125-8