Psychiatric genomics

An update and an Agenda

Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) is the largest consortium in the history of psychiatry. This global effort is dedicated to rapid progress and open science, and in the past decade it has delivered an increasing flow of new knowledge about the fundamental basis of common psychiatric disorders. The PGC has recently commenced a program of research designed to deliver “actionable” findings—genomic results that 1) reveal fundamental biology, 2) inform clinical practice, and 3) deliver new therapeutic targets. The central idea of the PGC is to convert the family history risk factor into biologically, clinically, and therapeutically meaningful insights. The emerging findings suggest that we are entering a phase of accelerated genetic discovery for multiple psychiatric disorders. These findings are likely to elucidate the genetic portions of these truly complex traits, and this knowledge can then be mined for its relevance for improved therapeutics and its impact on psychiatric practice within a precision medicine framework.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-27
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume175
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Genomics
Psychiatry
Precision Medicine
History
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee (2018). Psychiatric genomics: An update and an Agenda. American Journal of Psychiatry, 175(1), 15-27. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17030283

Psychiatric genomics : An update and an Agenda. / Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 175, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 15-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee 2018, 'Psychiatric genomics: An update and an Agenda', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 175, no. 1, pp. 15-27. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17030283
Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee. Psychiatric genomics: An update and an Agenda. American Journal of Psychiatry. 2018 Jan 1;175(1):15-27. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17030283
Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Coordinating Committee. / Psychiatric genomics : An update and an Agenda. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2018 ; Vol. 175, No. 1. pp. 15-27.
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