Psychiatric medication refill practices of juvenile detainees.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To examine the psychiatric medication fill rates of adolescents after release from juvenile detention. The team reviewed 177 charts. A fill was defined as a psychiatric medication charge to Medicaid 30- or 90-days after release. Differences in demographic characteristics were compared among individuals with fills at 30- or 90-days and those with no medication fills. Forty-five percent of patients were on at least one psychiatric medication. Among detainees on a psychiatric medication, 62 % had a fill by 30 days after release, and 78 % by 90 days. At least 50 % of the adolescents on a psychiatric medication were on an atypical antipsychotic. There was no significant relationship between medication fill and race, age, or sex. Despite the known associations between mental health diagnosis and treatment-seeking with age, sex, and race, it appears that psychiatric medication fill patterns after release from detention are not associated with these factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-726
Number of pages10
JournalChild Psychiatry and Human Development
Volume44
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Mental Health Associations
Medicaid
Antipsychotic Agents
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Psychiatric medication refill practices of juvenile detainees. / Neff, Mallery R.; Aalsma, Matthew; Rosenman, Marc; Wiehe, Sarah.

In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, Vol. 44, No. 6, 2013, p. 717-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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