Psychological maltreatment

Roberta Hibbard, Jane Barlow, Harriet MacMillan, Cindy W. Christian, James E. Crawford-Jakubiak, Emalee G. Flaherty, John M. Leventhal, James L. Lukefahr, Robert D. Sege, Catherine M. Nolan, Janet Saul, Tammy Piazza Hurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-378
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume130
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Child Abuse
Psychology
Parenting
Socialization
Interpersonal Relations
Child Development
Psychopathology
Caregivers
Cues
Nurses
Psychological
Maltreatment
Safety
Therapeutics
Emotion

Keywords

  • Child abuse
  • Development
  • Emotional maltreatment
  • Neglect
  • Psychological maltreatment
  • Verbal abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Hibbard, R., Barlow, J., MacMillan, H., Christian, C. W., Crawford-Jakubiak, J. E., Flaherty, E. G., ... Hurley, T. P. (2012). Psychological maltreatment. Pediatrics, 130(2), 372-378. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-1552

Psychological maltreatment. / Hibbard, Roberta; Barlow, Jane; MacMillan, Harriet; Christian, Cindy W.; Crawford-Jakubiak, James E.; Flaherty, Emalee G.; Leventhal, John M.; Lukefahr, James L.; Sege, Robert D.; Nolan, Catherine M.; Saul, Janet; Hurley, Tammy Piazza.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 130, No. 2, 08.2012, p. 372-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hibbard, R, Barlow, J, MacMillan, H, Christian, CW, Crawford-Jakubiak, JE, Flaherty, EG, Leventhal, JM, Lukefahr, JL, Sege, RD, Nolan, CM, Saul, J & Hurley, TP 2012, 'Psychological maltreatment', Pediatrics, vol. 130, no. 2, pp. 372-378. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-1552
Hibbard R, Barlow J, MacMillan H, Christian CW, Crawford-Jakubiak JE, Flaherty EG et al. Psychological maltreatment. Pediatrics. 2012 Aug;130(2):372-378. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-1552
Hibbard, Roberta ; Barlow, Jane ; MacMillan, Harriet ; Christian, Cindy W. ; Crawford-Jakubiak, James E. ; Flaherty, Emalee G. ; Leventhal, John M. ; Lukefahr, James L. ; Sege, Robert D. ; Nolan, Catherine M. ; Saul, Janet ; Hurley, Tammy Piazza. / Psychological maltreatment. In: Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 130, No. 2. pp. 372-378.
@article{dede3515bc184038802d8d52d3d3af34,
title = "Psychological maltreatment",
abstract = "Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem.",
keywords = "Child abuse, Development, Emotional maltreatment, Neglect, Psychological maltreatment, Verbal abuse",
author = "Roberta Hibbard and Jane Barlow and Harriet MacMillan and Christian, {Cindy W.} and Crawford-Jakubiak, {James E.} and Flaherty, {Emalee G.} and Leventhal, {John M.} and Lukefahr, {James L.} and Sege, {Robert D.} and Nolan, {Catherine M.} and Janet Saul and Hurley, {Tammy Piazza}",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1542/peds.2012-1552",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "130",
pages = "372--378",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Psychological maltreatment

AU - Hibbard, Roberta

AU - Barlow, Jane

AU - MacMillan, Harriet

AU - Christian, Cindy W.

AU - Crawford-Jakubiak, James E.

AU - Flaherty, Emalee G.

AU - Leventhal, John M.

AU - Lukefahr, James L.

AU - Sege, Robert D.

AU - Nolan, Catherine M.

AU - Saul, Janet

AU - Hurley, Tammy Piazza

PY - 2012/8

Y1 - 2012/8

N2 - Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem.

AB - Psychological or emotional maltreatment of children may be the most challenging and prevalent form of child abuse and neglect. Caregiver behaviors include acts of omission (ignoring need for social interactions) or commission (spurning, terrorizing); may be verbal or nonverbal, active or passive, and with or without intent to harm; and negatively affect the child's cognitive, social, emotional, and/or physical development. Psychological maltreatment has been linked with disorders of attachment, developmental and educational problems, socialization problems, disruptive behavior, and later psychopathology. Although no evidence-based interventions that can prevent psychological maltreatment have been identified to date, it is possible that interventions shown to be effective in reducing overall types of child maltreatment, such as the Nurse Family Partnership, may have a role to play. Furthermore, prevention before occurrence will require both the use of universal interventions aimed at promoting the type of parenting that is now recognized to be necessary for optimal child development, alongside the use of targeted interventions directed at improving parental sensitivity to a child's cues during infancy and later parent-child interactions. Intervention should, first and foremost, focus on a thorough assessment and ensuring the child's safety. Potentially effective treatments include cognitive behavioral parenting programs and other psychotherapeutic interventions. The high prevalence of psychological abuse in advanced Western societies, along with the serious consequences, point to the importance of effective management. Pediatricians should be alert to the occurrence of psychological maltreatment and identify ways to support families who have risk indicators for, or evidence of, this problem.

KW - Child abuse

KW - Development

KW - Emotional maltreatment

KW - Neglect

KW - Psychological maltreatment

KW - Verbal abuse

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864527087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864527087&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1542/peds.2012-1552

DO - 10.1542/peds.2012-1552

M3 - Article

C2 - 22848125

AN - SCOPUS:84864527087

VL - 130

SP - 372

EP - 378

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 2

ER -