Psychosocial Outcomes in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DESIGN: Psychosocial outcomes were measured using two well-validated, parent-completed checklists: the Behavior Assessment System for Children and the Conduct Hyperactive Attention Problem Oppositional Symptom. Neurocognitive skills were measured using gold standard, performance-based assessments of language and executive functioning.

RESULTS: CI users were at greater risk for clinically significant deficits in areas related to attention, oppositional behavior, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and social-adaptive skills compared with their normal-hearing peers, although the majority of CI users scored within average ranges relative to Behavior Assessment System for Children norms. Regression analyses revealed that language, visual-spatial working memory, and inhibition-concentration skills predicted psychosocial outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that underlying delays and deficits in language and executive functioning may place some CI users at a risk for difficulties in psychosocial adjustment.

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to investigate psychosocial outcomes in a sample of prelingually deaf, early-implanted children, adolescents, and young adults who are long-term cochlear implant (CI) users and to examine the extent to which language and executive functioning predict psychosocial outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-539
Number of pages13
JournalEar and Hearing
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Language
Social Adjustment
Impulsive Behavior
Checklist
Short-Term Memory
Hearing
Young Adult
Regression Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Psychosocial Outcomes in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users. / Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William; Pisoni, David.

In: Ear and Hearing, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 527-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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