Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension

Marius George Linguraru, Nisha Mukherjee, Robert L. Van Uitert, Ronald M. Summers, Mark T. Gladwin, Roberto Machado, Bradford J. Wood

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a known complication associated with sickle-cell disease; roughly 75% of sickle cell disease-afflicted patients have pulmonary arterial hypertension at the time of death. This prospective study investigates the potential of image analysis to act as a surrogate for presence and extent of disease, and whether the size change of the pulmonary arteries of sickle cell patients could be linked to sickle-cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary CT-Angiography scans from sickle-cell patients were obtained and retrospectively analyzed. Randomly selected pulmonary CT-Angiography studies from patients without sickle-cell anemia were used as negative controls. First, images were smoothed using anisotropic diffusion. Then, a combination of fast marching and geodesic active contours level sets were employed to segment the pulmonary artery. An algorithm based on fast marching methods was used to compute the centerline of the segmented arteries. From the centerline, the diameters at the pulmonary trunk and first branch of the pulmonary arteries were measured automatically. Arterial diameters were normalized to the width of the thoracic cavity, patient weight and body surface. Results show that the pulmonary trunk and first right and left pulmonary arterial branches at the pulmonary trunk junction are significantly larger in diameter with increased blood flow in sickle-cell anemia patients as compared to controls (p values of 0.0278 for trunk and 0.0007 for branches). CT with image processing shows great potential as a surrogate indicator of pulmonary hemodynamics or response to therapy, which could be an important tool for drug discovery and noninvasive clinical surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images
Volume6916
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventMedical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 17 2008Feb 19 2008

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period2/17/082/19/08

Fingerprint

Angiography
Hemodynamics
Image analysis
Image processing
Blood
Drug Discovery

Keywords

  • Pulmonary artery
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Quantification
  • Segmentation
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Skeletonization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Linguraru, M. G., Mukherjee, N., Van Uitert, R. L., Summers, R. M., Gladwin, M. T., Machado, R., & Wood, B. J. (2008). Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension. In Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images (Vol. 6916). [691612] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.770485

Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension. / Linguraru, Marius George; Mukherjee, Nisha; Van Uitert, Robert L.; Summers, Ronald M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Machado, Roberto; Wood, Bradford J.

Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images. Vol. 6916 2008. 691612.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Linguraru, MG, Mukherjee, N, Van Uitert, RL, Summers, RM, Gladwin, MT, Machado, R & Wood, BJ 2008, Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension. in Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images. vol. 6916, 691612, Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images, San Diego, CA, United States, 2/17/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.770485
Linguraru MG, Mukherjee N, Van Uitert RL, Summers RM, Gladwin MT, Machado R et al. Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension. In Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images. Vol. 6916. 2008. 691612 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.770485
Linguraru, Marius George ; Mukherjee, Nisha ; Van Uitert, Robert L. ; Summers, Ronald M. ; Gladwin, Mark T. ; Machado, Roberto ; Wood, Bradford J. / Pulmonary artery segmentation and quantification in sickle cell associated pulmonary hypertension. Medical Imaging 2008 - Physiology, Function, and Structure from Medical Images. Vol. 6916 2008.
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