Pursuing integration of performance measures into electronic medical records

Beta-adrenerqic receptor antagonist medications

Michael Weiner, T. E. Stump, Christopher Callahan, J. N. Lewis, C. J. McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Electronic medical records seldom integrate performance indicators into daily operations. Assessing quality indicators traditionally requires resource intensive chart reviews of small samples. We sought to use an electronic medical record to assess use of β-adrenergic antagonist medications (β-blockers) following myocardial infarction, to compare a standardized manual assessment with assessment using electronic medical records, and to discuss potential for future integration of performance indicators into electronic records. Design: Cross-sectional data analysis. Setting: An urban academic medical center. Participants: US Medicare beneficiaries 65 years of age or older, admitted to hospital with myocardial infarction between 1995 and 1999. Measurements and main results: Manual chart review was compared with a computer driven assessment of electronic records. Administration of β-blockers and cases excluded from use of β-blockers were measured, based on Medicare criteria. Among 4490 older adults, 391 (4%) of 9018 hospital admissions contained codes for myocardial infarction. In 323 (83%) of the 391 hospital admissions, criteria for excluding β-blockers were met; 235 (60%) were excluded due to heart failure. Of 68 hospital admissions for myocardial infarction that did not meet exclusion criteria, physicians prescribed β-blockers in 49 (72%) on admission and 42 (62%) at discharge. Compared with manual chart review, electronic review had a sensitivity of 83-100% and led to fewer false negative findings. Conclusions: An electronic medical records system can be used instead of chart review to measure use of β-blockers after myocardial infarction. This should lead to integration of real time automated performance measurement into electronic medical records.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-106
Number of pages8
JournalQuality and Safety in Health Care
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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Electronic Health Records
Myocardial Infarction
Medicare
Adrenergic Antagonists
Heart Failure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Pursuing integration of performance measures into electronic medical records : Beta-adrenerqic receptor antagonist medications. / Weiner, Michael; Stump, T. E.; Callahan, Christopher; Lewis, J. N.; McDonald, C. J.

In: Quality and Safety in Health Care, Vol. 14, No. 2, 04.2005, p. 99-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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