Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors

Lesli E. Skolarus, Lynda D. Lisabeth, James F. Burke, Deborah A. Levine, Lewis B. Morgenstern, Linda Williams, Paul N. Pfeiffer, Devin L. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: African Americans, Hispanics and some Asian subgroups have a higher stroke incidence than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Additionally, African Americans and Hispanics have worse stroke outcomes than non-Hispanic Whites. Thus, we explored racial and ethnic differences in mental distress, a known risk factor for post-stroke disability.

METHODS: National Health Interview Survey data from 2000-2010 were used to identify 8,324 community dwelling adults with self-reported stroke. Serious mental distress was identified by the Kessler-6 scale. Logistic regression models assessed racial/ethnic associations with serious mental distress after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, disability, health care utilization and socioeconomic factors.

RESULTS: Serious mental distress was identified in 9% of stroke survivors. Hispanics (14%) were more likely to have serious mental distress than African Americans (9%), non-Hispanic Whites (9%) and Asians (8%, P = .02). After adjustment, Hispanics (OR = 1.06, 95% CI .76-1.48) and Asians (.84, 95% Cl .37-1.90) had a similar odds of serious mental distress while African Americans had a lower odds of serious mental distress (OR = .61, 95% CI .48-.78) compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Younger age, low levels of education and insurance were important predictors of serious mental distress among Hispanics.

CONCLUSION: Serious mental distress is highly prevalent among US stroke survivors and is more common in Hispanics than NHWs, African Americans and Asians. Further study of the role of mental distress in ethnic differences in post-stroke disability is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-144
Number of pages7
JournalEthnicity and Disease
Volume25
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Survivors
Hispanic Americans
Stroke
African Americans
Logistic Models
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Independent Living
Health Surveys
Insurance
Comorbidity
Demography
Interviews
Education
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Skolarus, L. E., Lisabeth, L. D., Burke, J. F., Levine, D. A., Morgenstern, L. B., Williams, L., ... Brown, D. L. (2015). Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors. Ethnicity and Disease, 25(2), 138-144.

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors. / Skolarus, Lesli E.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Burke, James F.; Levine, Deborah A.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Williams, Linda; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Brown, Devin L.

In: Ethnicity and Disease, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.03.2015, p. 138-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skolarus, LE, Lisabeth, LD, Burke, JF, Levine, DA, Morgenstern, LB, Williams, L, Pfeiffer, PN & Brown, DL 2015, 'Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors', Ethnicity and Disease, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 138-144.
Skolarus LE, Lisabeth LD, Burke JF, Levine DA, Morgenstern LB, Williams L et al. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors. Ethnicity and Disease. 2015 Mar 1;25(2):138-144.
Skolarus, Lesli E. ; Lisabeth, Lynda D. ; Burke, James F. ; Levine, Deborah A. ; Morgenstern, Lewis B. ; Williams, Linda ; Pfeiffer, Paul N. ; Brown, Devin L. / Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Distress among Stroke Survivors. In: Ethnicity and Disease. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 138-144.
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: African Americans, Hispanics and some Asian subgroups have a higher stroke incidence than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Additionally, African Americans and Hispanics have worse stroke outcomes than non-Hispanic Whites. Thus, we explored racial and ethnic differences in mental distress, a known risk factor for post-stroke disability.METHODS: National Health Interview Survey data from 2000-2010 were used to identify 8,324 community dwelling adults with self-reported stroke. Serious mental distress was identified by the Kessler-6 scale. Logistic regression models assessed racial/ethnic associations with serious mental distress after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, disability, health care utilization and socioeconomic factors.RESULTS: Serious mental distress was identified in 9% of stroke survivors. Hispanics (14%) were more likely to have serious mental distress than African Americans (9%), non-Hispanic Whites (9%) and Asians (8%, P = .02). After adjustment, Hispanics (OR = 1.06, 95% CI .76-1.48) and Asians (.84, 95% Cl .37-1.90) had a similar odds of serious mental distress while African Americans had a lower odds of serious mental distress (OR = .61, 95% CI .48-.78) compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Younger age, low levels of education and insurance were important predictors of serious mental distress among Hispanics.CONCLUSION: Serious mental distress is highly prevalent among US stroke survivors and is more common in Hispanics than NHWs, African Americans and Asians. Further study of the role of mental distress in ethnic differences in post-stroke disability is warranted.

AB - OBJECTIVE: African Americans, Hispanics and some Asian subgroups have a higher stroke incidence than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Additionally, African Americans and Hispanics have worse stroke outcomes than non-Hispanic Whites. Thus, we explored racial and ethnic differences in mental distress, a known risk factor for post-stroke disability.METHODS: National Health Interview Survey data from 2000-2010 were used to identify 8,324 community dwelling adults with self-reported stroke. Serious mental distress was identified by the Kessler-6 scale. Logistic regression models assessed racial/ethnic associations with serious mental distress after adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, disability, health care utilization and socioeconomic factors.RESULTS: Serious mental distress was identified in 9% of stroke survivors. Hispanics (14%) were more likely to have serious mental distress than African Americans (9%), non-Hispanic Whites (9%) and Asians (8%, P = .02). After adjustment, Hispanics (OR = 1.06, 95% CI .76-1.48) and Asians (.84, 95% Cl .37-1.90) had a similar odds of serious mental distress while African Americans had a lower odds of serious mental distress (OR = .61, 95% CI .48-.78) compared with non-Hispanic Whites. Younger age, low levels of education and insurance were important predictors of serious mental distress among Hispanics.CONCLUSION: Serious mental distress is highly prevalent among US stroke survivors and is more common in Hispanics than NHWs, African Americans and Asians. Further study of the role of mental distress in ethnic differences in post-stroke disability is warranted.

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