Racial differences in bone turnover and calcium metabolism in adolescent females

R. J. Bryant, M. E. Wastney, B. R. Martin, O. Wood, G. P. McCabe, M. Morshidi, D. L. Smith, Munro Peacock, Connie M. Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blacks develop a higher peak bone mass than whites which is associated with a reduced risk for bone fracture. The physiological basis for the difference in bone mass was investigated by metabolic balance and calcium kinetic studies in adolescent black and white girls. The hypothesis that the greater peak bone mass in blacks compared with whites is due to suppressed bone resorption was tested. Subjects were housed in a supervised environment for 3 wk during which time they consumed a controlled diet and collected all excreta. Subjects were given stable calcium isotopes orally and intravenously after 1 wk adaptation. Blacks have greater calcium retention (mean ± SD, 11.5 ± 6.1 vs. 7.3 ± 4.1 mmol/d, P < 0.05) consistent with greater bone formation rates (49.4 ± 13.5 vs. 36.5 ± 13.6 mmol/d, P < 0.05) relative to bone resorption rates (37.4 ± 13.2 vs. 29.4 ± 10.9 mmol/d, P = 0.07), increased calcium absorption efficiency (54 ± 19 vs. 38 ± 18%, P < 0.05) and decreased urinary calcium (1.15 ± 0.95 vs. 2.50 ± 1.35 mmol/d, P < 0.001), compared with whites. The racial differences in calcium retention in adolescence can account for the racial differences in bone mass of adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1043-1047
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Bone Remodeling
Metabolism
Bone
Calcium
Bone and Bones
Bone Resorption
Calcium Isotopes
Bone Fractures
Osteogenesis
Diet
Nutrition
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Bryant, R. J., Wastney, M. E., Martin, B. R., Wood, O., McCabe, G. P., Morshidi, M., ... Weaver, C. M. (2003). Racial differences in bone turnover and calcium metabolism in adolescent females. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 88(3), 1043-1047. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2002-021367

Racial differences in bone turnover and calcium metabolism in adolescent females. / Bryant, R. J.; Wastney, M. E.; Martin, B. R.; Wood, O.; McCabe, G. P.; Morshidi, M.; Smith, D. L.; Peacock, Munro; Weaver, Connie M.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 88, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 1043-1047.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bryant, RJ, Wastney, ME, Martin, BR, Wood, O, McCabe, GP, Morshidi, M, Smith, DL, Peacock, M & Weaver, CM 2003, 'Racial differences in bone turnover and calcium metabolism in adolescent females', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 1043-1047. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2002-021367
Bryant, R. J. ; Wastney, M. E. ; Martin, B. R. ; Wood, O. ; McCabe, G. P. ; Morshidi, M. ; Smith, D. L. ; Peacock, Munro ; Weaver, Connie M. / Racial differences in bone turnover and calcium metabolism in adolescent females. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2003 ; Vol. 88, No. 3. pp. 1043-1047.
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