Racial disparity in cardiac decision making: Results from patient focus groups

Jeffrey A. Ferguson, Morris Weinberger, Glenda R. Westmorland, Lorrie A. Mamlin, Douglas S. Segar, James Y. Greene, Douglas Martin, William M. Tierney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: While numerous studies suggest that African Americans receive fewer invasive cardiac procedures than whites, the basis for these treatment differences is not understood. Methods: We conducted focus group sessions with patients who had received treatment in the hospital or the emergency department within the preceding 3 months for ischemic heart disease at 2 urban, university-affiliated hospitals. Results: Discussions with patients identified the following factors that influenced their decision making: clarity, simplicity, and consistency of treatment recommendations; advice from friends and family about whether to accept recommendations; availability to speak with others who accepted similar recommendations; and having honest and caring physicians. African American patients identified the following additional factors that influenced their decision making: perceptions of health care discrimination; perceptions of undesirable physician behavior; faith in God to control one's destiny; and patient- physician camaraderie. Conclusions: Participants identified common issues influencing health care decision making, regardless of race. However, additional factors were expressed only by African American participants. These factors conveyed racial differences in perceptions of the health care system that may, in part, contribute to differences in health care decision making and treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1450-1453
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume158
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 1998

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Focus Groups
Decision Making
African Americans
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Therapeutics
Myocardial Ischemia
Hospital Emergency Service

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Ferguson, J. A., Weinberger, M., Westmorland, G. R., Mamlin, L. A., Segar, D. S., Greene, J. Y., ... Tierney, W. M. (1998). Racial disparity in cardiac decision making: Results from patient focus groups. Archives of Internal Medicine, 158(13), 1450-1453. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.158.13.1450

Racial disparity in cardiac decision making : Results from patient focus groups. / Ferguson, Jeffrey A.; Weinberger, Morris; Westmorland, Glenda R.; Mamlin, Lorrie A.; Segar, Douglas S.; Greene, James Y.; Martin, Douglas; Tierney, William M.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 158, No. 13, 15.07.1998, p. 1450-1453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferguson, JA, Weinberger, M, Westmorland, GR, Mamlin, LA, Segar, DS, Greene, JY, Martin, D & Tierney, WM 1998, 'Racial disparity in cardiac decision making: Results from patient focus groups', Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 158, no. 13, pp. 1450-1453. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.158.13.1450
Ferguson JA, Weinberger M, Westmorland GR, Mamlin LA, Segar DS, Greene JY et al. Racial disparity in cardiac decision making: Results from patient focus groups. Archives of Internal Medicine. 1998 Jul 15;158(13):1450-1453. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.158.13.1450
Ferguson, Jeffrey A. ; Weinberger, Morris ; Westmorland, Glenda R. ; Mamlin, Lorrie A. ; Segar, Douglas S. ; Greene, James Y. ; Martin, Douglas ; Tierney, William M. / Racial disparity in cardiac decision making : Results from patient focus groups. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1998 ; Vol. 158, No. 13. pp. 1450-1453.
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