Randall's plaque: Pathogenesis and role in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

Andrew Evan, J. Lingeman, F. L. Coe, E. Worcester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of these studies was to test the hypothesis that Randall's plaque develops in unique anatomical sites of the kidney and their formation is conditioned by specific stone-forming pathophysiologies. We performed intraoperative papillary biopsies from kidneys of idiopathic-calcium oxalate (CaOx), intestinal bypass for obesity, brushite (BR) and cystine stone formers (SF) during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Tissues were examined by infrared analysis and light and electron microscopy. Our analysis revealed a distinct pattern of mineral deposition and papillary pathology for each type of SF. CaOx SF had interstitial apatite crystals beginning at thin loops of Henle. These deposits termed Randall's plaque are thought to serve as sites for stone attachment. No tubular injury was noted. Intestinal bypass patients possessed intraluminal apatite deposits in inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) with associated cell injury. BR SF showed the most severe form of cortical and medullary changes with sites of Randall's plaque, and yellowish intraluminal deposits of apatite in IMCD. Cystine SF had plugging of ducts of Bellini with cystine crystals and apatite deposits in IMCD and loops of Henle. Intratubular sites of crystalline deposits were always associated to adjacent regions of interstitial fibrosis. The metabolic, anatomic, and surgical pathologic findings in four distinct groups of SF clearly show that 'the histology of the renal papilla from a stone former, is particular to the clinical setting'. We believe our approach to studying stone disease will provide insights into the pathogenesis of stone formation for each type of SF that will lead to improved clinical treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1313-1318
Number of pages6
JournalKidney International
Volume69
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Apatites
Cystine
Jejunoileal Bypass
Loop of Henle
Calcium Oxalate
Kidney
Percutaneous Nephrostomy
Wounds and Injuries
Minerals
Histology
Electron Microscopy
Fibrosis
Obesity
Pathology
Biopsy
Light
Calcium Oxalate Nephrolithiasis
dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Histopathology
  • Kidney biosy
  • Kidney stones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Randall's plaque : Pathogenesis and role in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. / Evan, Andrew; Lingeman, J.; Coe, F. L.; Worcester, E.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 69, No. 8, 04.2006, p. 1313-1318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evan, Andrew ; Lingeman, J. ; Coe, F. L. ; Worcester, E. / Randall's plaque : Pathogenesis and role in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. In: Kidney International. 2006 ; Vol. 69, No. 8. pp. 1313-1318.
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