Randomized trial of a self-management program for primary care patients with acute low back pain: Short-term effects

Teresa M. Damush, Morris Weinberger, Susan M. Perkins, Jaya K. Rao, William M. Tierney, Rong Qi, Daniel O. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. We evaluated the effect of a self-management program (SMP) on primary care patients with acute low back pain (ALBP) from low income, inner city neighborhood health centers and an emergency department of a public teaching hospital. Methods. We randomized 211 primary care patients who visited a physician for ALBP (<90 days duration) to usual care or an SMP. The SMP consisted of 3 group sessions and telephone followup that focused on understanding back pain, increasing physical activity, and dealing with fears and frustrations. Results. Of the eligible patients, 52% expressed interest in participation and 39% of all eligible patients were randomized into the study. Among patients in the treatment group, 28.3% attended at least 1 group class, 62.3% received the intervention by mail, telephone, and audiotapes, and 9.4% received no intervention. Interviewers, blinded to the treatment given, collected data at baseline and at 4 months following randomization. Compared with the control group, the intervention group reported significantly better emotional functioning (P < 0.01), increased self efficacy to manage ALBP (P < = 0.03), and less fear of movement (P = 0.05) after 4 months. Conclusion. This SMP produced short-term improvements in emotional functioning and self efficacy to manage symptoms among patients with ALBP living in the inner city. However, methods of program delivery other than group classes are needed to reach a greater portion of the inner city patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-186
Number of pages8
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume49
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003

Fingerprint

Self Care
Low Back Pain
Primary Health Care
Self Efficacy
Telephone
Fear
Tape Recording
Community Health Centers
Frustration
Public Hospitals
Postal Service
Back Pain
Random Allocation
Teaching Hospitals
Hospital Emergency Service
Interviews
Exercise
Physicians
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Functional status
  • Low back pain
  • Self efficacy
  • Self management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Randomized trial of a self-management program for primary care patients with acute low back pain : Short-term effects. / Damush, Teresa M.; Weinberger, Morris; Perkins, Susan M.; Rao, Jaya K.; Tierney, William M.; Qi, Rong; Clark, Daniel O.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 49, No. 2, 15.04.2003, p. 179-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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