Rat animal models for screening medications to treat alcohol use disorders

Richard Bell, Sheketha R. Hauser, Tiebing Liang, Youssef Sari, Antoniette Maldonado-Devincci, Zachary Rodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this review is to present animal research models that can be used to screen and/or repurpose medications for the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus will be on rats and in particular selectively bred rats. Brief introductions discuss various aspects of the clinical picture, which provide characteristics of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to model in animals. Following this, multiple selectively bred rat lines will be described and evaluated in the context of animal models used to screen medications to treat AUDs. Next, common behavioral tests for drug efficacy will be discussed particularly as they relate to stages in the addiction cycle. Tables highlighting studies that have tested the effects of compounds using the respective techniques are included. Wherever possible the Tables are organized chronologically in ascending order to describe changes in the focus of research on AUDs over time. In general, high ethanol-consuming selectively bred rats have been used to test a wide range of compounds. Older studies usually followed neurobiological findings in the selected lines that supported an association with a propensity for high ethanol intake. Most of these tests evaluated the compound's effects on the maintenance of ethanol drinking. Very few compounds have been tested during ethanol-seeking and/or relapse and fewer still have assessed their effects during the acquisition of AUDs. Overall, while a substantial number of neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory system targets have been assessed; the roles of sex- and age-of-animal, as well as the acquisition of AUDs, ethanol-seeking and relapse continue to be factors and behaviors needing further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeuropharmacology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ethanol
Animal Models
Alcohols
Alcoholism
Recurrence
Drinking
Neurotransmitter Agents
Maintenance
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • AA
  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Alcoholism
  • Family history positive
  • Genetically predisposed
  • HAD
  • MsP
  • P
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Selectively bred
  • SP
  • UChB
  • WHP

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Rat animal models for screening medications to treat alcohol use disorders. / Bell, Richard; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Liang, Tiebing; Sari, Youssef; Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette; Rodd, Zachary.

In: Neuropharmacology, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9dffdb3b102e48d0b0a14f418cbf9bf2,
title = "Rat animal models for screening medications to treat alcohol use disorders",
abstract = "The purpose of this review is to present animal research models that can be used to screen and/or repurpose medications for the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus will be on rats and in particular selectively bred rats. Brief introductions discuss various aspects of the clinical picture, which provide characteristics of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to model in animals. Following this, multiple selectively bred rat lines will be described and evaluated in the context of animal models used to screen medications to treat AUDs. Next, common behavioral tests for drug efficacy will be discussed particularly as they relate to stages in the addiction cycle. Tables highlighting studies that have tested the effects of compounds using the respective techniques are included. Wherever possible the Tables are organized chronologically in ascending order to describe changes in the focus of research on AUDs over time. In general, high ethanol-consuming selectively bred rats have been used to test a wide range of compounds. Older studies usually followed neurobiological findings in the selected lines that supported an association with a propensity for high ethanol intake. Most of these tests evaluated the compound's effects on the maintenance of ethanol drinking. Very few compounds have been tested during ethanol-seeking and/or relapse and fewer still have assessed their effects during the acquisition of AUDs. Overall, while a substantial number of neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory system targets have been assessed; the roles of sex- and age-of-animal, as well as the acquisition of AUDs, ethanol-seeking and relapse continue to be factors and behaviors needing further study.",
keywords = "AA, Alcohol use disorder, Alcoholism, Family history positive, Genetically predisposed, HAD, MsP, P, Pharmacotherapy, Selectively bred, SP, UChB, WHP",
author = "Richard Bell and Hauser, {Sheketha R.} and Tiebing Liang and Youssef Sari and Antoniette Maldonado-Devincci and Zachary Rodd",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.02.004",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Neuropharmacology",
issn = "0028-3908",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rat animal models for screening medications to treat alcohol use disorders

AU - Bell, Richard

AU - Hauser, Sheketha R.

AU - Liang, Tiebing

AU - Sari, Youssef

AU - Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette

AU - Rodd, Zachary

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - The purpose of this review is to present animal research models that can be used to screen and/or repurpose medications for the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus will be on rats and in particular selectively bred rats. Brief introductions discuss various aspects of the clinical picture, which provide characteristics of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to model in animals. Following this, multiple selectively bred rat lines will be described and evaluated in the context of animal models used to screen medications to treat AUDs. Next, common behavioral tests for drug efficacy will be discussed particularly as they relate to stages in the addiction cycle. Tables highlighting studies that have tested the effects of compounds using the respective techniques are included. Wherever possible the Tables are organized chronologically in ascending order to describe changes in the focus of research on AUDs over time. In general, high ethanol-consuming selectively bred rats have been used to test a wide range of compounds. Older studies usually followed neurobiological findings in the selected lines that supported an association with a propensity for high ethanol intake. Most of these tests evaluated the compound's effects on the maintenance of ethanol drinking. Very few compounds have been tested during ethanol-seeking and/or relapse and fewer still have assessed their effects during the acquisition of AUDs. Overall, while a substantial number of neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory system targets have been assessed; the roles of sex- and age-of-animal, as well as the acquisition of AUDs, ethanol-seeking and relapse continue to be factors and behaviors needing further study.

AB - The purpose of this review is to present animal research models that can be used to screen and/or repurpose medications for the treatment of alcohol abuse and dependence. The focus will be on rats and in particular selectively bred rats. Brief introductions discuss various aspects of the clinical picture, which provide characteristics of individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) to model in animals. Following this, multiple selectively bred rat lines will be described and evaluated in the context of animal models used to screen medications to treat AUDs. Next, common behavioral tests for drug efficacy will be discussed particularly as they relate to stages in the addiction cycle. Tables highlighting studies that have tested the effects of compounds using the respective techniques are included. Wherever possible the Tables are organized chronologically in ascending order to describe changes in the focus of research on AUDs over time. In general, high ethanol-consuming selectively bred rats have been used to test a wide range of compounds. Older studies usually followed neurobiological findings in the selected lines that supported an association with a propensity for high ethanol intake. Most of these tests evaluated the compound's effects on the maintenance of ethanol drinking. Very few compounds have been tested during ethanol-seeking and/or relapse and fewer still have assessed their effects during the acquisition of AUDs. Overall, while a substantial number of neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory system targets have been assessed; the roles of sex- and age-of-animal, as well as the acquisition of AUDs, ethanol-seeking and relapse continue to be factors and behaviors needing further study.

KW - AA

KW - Alcohol use disorder

KW - Alcoholism

KW - Family history positive

KW - Genetically predisposed

KW - HAD

KW - MsP

KW - P

KW - Pharmacotherapy

KW - Selectively bred

KW - SP

KW - UChB

KW - WHP

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020109818&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020109818&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.02.004

DO - 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.02.004

M3 - Article

C2 - 28215999

AN - SCOPUS:85020109818

JO - Neuropharmacology

JF - Neuropharmacology

SN - 0028-3908

ER -