Rate of kidney function decline associates with mortality

Ziyad Al-Aly, Angelique Zeringue, John Fu, Michael I. Rauchman, Jay R. McDonald, Tarek Ashkar (El-Achkar), Sumitra Balasubramanian, Diana Nurutdinova, Hong Xian, Kevin Stroupe, Kevin C. Abbott, Seth Eisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of rate of decline of kidney function on risk for death is not well understood. Using the Department of Veterans Affairs national databases, we retrospectively studied a cohort of 4171 patients who had rheumatoid arthritis and early stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD; estimated GFR 45 to 60 ml/min) and followed them longitudinally to characterize predictors of disease progression and the effect of rate of kidney function decline on mortality. After a median of 2.6 years, 1604 (38%) maintained stable kidney function; 426 (10%), 1147 (28%), and 994 (24%) experienced mild, moderate, and severe progression of CKD, respectively (defined as estimated GFR decline of 0 to 1, 1 to 4, and >4 ml/min per yr). Peripheral artery disease predicted moderate progression of CKD progression. Black race, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and peripheral artery disease predicted severe progression of CKD. After a median of 5.7 years, patients with severe progression had a significantly increased risk for mortality (hazard ratio 1.54; 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 1.82) compared with those with mild progression; patients with moderate progression exhibited a similar trend (hazard ratio 1.10; 95% confidence interval 0.98 to 1.30). Our results demonstrate an independent and graded association between the rate of kidney function decline and mortality. Incorporating the rate of decline into the definition of CKD may transform a static definition into a dynamic one that more accurately describes the potential consequences of the disease for an individual.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1961-1969
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume21
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Kidney
Mortality
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Confidence Intervals
Veterans
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Disease Progression
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Databases
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Al-Aly, Z., Zeringue, A., Fu, J., Rauchman, M. I., McDonald, J. R., Ashkar (El-Achkar), T., ... Eisen, S. (2010). Rate of kidney function decline associates with mortality. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 21(11), 1961-1969. https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2009121210

Rate of kidney function decline associates with mortality. / Al-Aly, Ziyad; Zeringue, Angelique; Fu, John; Rauchman, Michael I.; McDonald, Jay R.; Ashkar (El-Achkar), Tarek; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Nurutdinova, Diana; Xian, Hong; Stroupe, Kevin; Abbott, Kevin C.; Eisen, Seth.

In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 21, No. 11, 11.2010, p. 1961-1969.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Aly, Z, Zeringue, A, Fu, J, Rauchman, MI, McDonald, JR, Ashkar (El-Achkar), T, Balasubramanian, S, Nurutdinova, D, Xian, H, Stroupe, K, Abbott, KC & Eisen, S 2010, 'Rate of kidney function decline associates with mortality', Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol. 21, no. 11, pp. 1961-1969. https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2009121210
Al-Aly, Ziyad ; Zeringue, Angelique ; Fu, John ; Rauchman, Michael I. ; McDonald, Jay R. ; Ashkar (El-Achkar), Tarek ; Balasubramanian, Sumitra ; Nurutdinova, Diana ; Xian, Hong ; Stroupe, Kevin ; Abbott, Kevin C. ; Eisen, Seth. / Rate of kidney function decline associates with mortality. In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2010 ; Vol. 21, No. 11. pp. 1961-1969.
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