Reactive glia are recruited by highly proliferative brain metastases of breast cancer and promote tumor cell colonization

Daniel P. Fitzgerald, Diane Palmieri, Emily Hua, Elizabeth Hargrave, Jeanne M. Herring, Yongzhen Qian, Eleazar Vega-Valle, Robert J. Weil, Andreas M. Stark, Alexander Vortmeyer, Patricia S. Steeg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment are crucial to tumor formation and metastasis. The central nervous system serves as a "sanctuary" site for metastasis, resulting in poor prognosis in diagnosed patients. The incidence of brain metastasis is increasing; however, little is known about interactions between the brain and metastatic cells. Brain pathology was examined in an experimental model system of brain metastasis, using a subline of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. The results were compared with an analysis of sixteen resected human brain metastases of breast cancer. Experimental metastases formed preferentially in specific brain regions, with a distribution similar to clinical cases. In both the 231-BR model, and in human specimens, Ki67 expression indicated that metastases were highly proliferative (∼50%). Little apoptosis was observed in either set of tumors. In the model system, metastases elicited a brain inflammatory response, with extensive reactive gliosis surrounding metastases. Similarly, large numbers of glial cells were found within the inner tumor mass of human brain metastases. In vitro co-cultures demonstrated that glia induced a ∼5-fold increase in metastatic cell proliferation (P < 0.001), suggesting that brain tissue secretes factors conducive to tumor cell growth. Molecules used to signal between tumor cells and the surrounding glia could provide a new avenue of therapeutic targets for brain metastases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)799-810
Number of pages12
JournalClinical and Experimental Metastasis
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuroglia
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Brain
Neoplasms
Cellular Microenvironment
Gliosis
Tumor Microenvironment
Thromboplastin
Coculture Techniques
Theoretical Models
Central Nervous System
Cell Proliferation
Apoptosis
Pathology
Incidence

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • Brain pathology
  • Breast cancer
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Reactive glia
  • Xenograft

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Reactive glia are recruited by highly proliferative brain metastases of breast cancer and promote tumor cell colonization. / Fitzgerald, Daniel P.; Palmieri, Diane; Hua, Emily; Hargrave, Elizabeth; Herring, Jeanne M.; Qian, Yongzhen; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Weil, Robert J.; Stark, Andreas M.; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Steeg, Patricia S.

In: Clinical and Experimental Metastasis, Vol. 25, No. 7, 01.11.2008, p. 799-810.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fitzgerald, DP, Palmieri, D, Hua, E, Hargrave, E, Herring, JM, Qian, Y, Vega-Valle, E, Weil, RJ, Stark, AM, Vortmeyer, A & Steeg, PS 2008, 'Reactive glia are recruited by highly proliferative brain metastases of breast cancer and promote tumor cell colonization', Clinical and Experimental Metastasis, vol. 25, no. 7, pp. 799-810. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10585-008-9193-z
Fitzgerald, Daniel P. ; Palmieri, Diane ; Hua, Emily ; Hargrave, Elizabeth ; Herring, Jeanne M. ; Qian, Yongzhen ; Vega-Valle, Eleazar ; Weil, Robert J. ; Stark, Andreas M. ; Vortmeyer, Alexander ; Steeg, Patricia S. / Reactive glia are recruited by highly proliferative brain metastases of breast cancer and promote tumor cell colonization. In: Clinical and Experimental Metastasis. 2008 ; Vol. 25, No. 7. pp. 799-810.
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