Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy

Yusuke Yamani, Jessie Chin, Elise A G Meyers, Xuefei Gao, Daniel G. Morrow, Elizabeth A L Stine-Morrow, Thembi Conner-Garcia, James F. Graumlich, Michael Murray

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding patient skills, abilities, and other resources related to health literacy is crucial for improvement of self-care knowledge and behaviors. The current study explored links between cognitive abilities, knowledge, and reading engagement within the framework of process-knowledge model of health literacy (e.g., Chin et al., 2011) as measured using the S-TOFHLA (Baker et al., 1999). The data suggest that more reading engagement compensates limits of processing capacity for better health-related literacy. The results imply that patient education about the benefits of engagement in reading activities may potentially improve health literacy and comprehension of self-care information among older adults with lower processing capacity.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages916-920
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 22 2012Oct 26 2012

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/22/1210/26/12

Fingerprint

literacy
Health
Processing
health
cognitive ability
comprehension
Education
ability
resources
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Yamani, Y., Chin, J., Meyers, E. A. G., Gao, X., Morrow, D. G., Stine-Morrow, E. A. L., ... Murray, M. (2012). Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 916-920) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561191

Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy. / Yamani, Yusuke; Chin, Jessie; Meyers, Elise A G; Gao, Xuefei; Morrow, Daniel G.; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Graumlich, James F.; Murray, Michael.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2012. p. 916-920.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yamani, Y, Chin, J, Meyers, EAG, Gao, X, Morrow, DG, Stine-Morrow, EAL, Conner-Garcia, T, Graumlich, JF & Murray, M 2012, Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. pp. 916-920, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, HFES 2012, Boston, MA, United States, 10/22/12. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561191
Yamani Y, Chin J, Meyers EAG, Gao X, Morrow DG, Stine-Morrow EAL et al. Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2012. p. 916-920 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181312561191
Yamani, Yusuke ; Chin, Jessie ; Meyers, Elise A G ; Gao, Xuefei ; Morrow, Daniel G. ; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L ; Conner-Garcia, Thembi ; Graumlich, James F. ; Murray, Michael. / Reading engagement offsets declines in processing capacity for health literacy. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2012. pp. 916-920
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