Real-world simulation of an alternative retinopathy of prematurity screening system in Thailand: A pilot study

S. Grace Prakalapakorn, Sharon F. Freedman, Amy K. Hutchinson, Piyada Saehout, Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel, David K. Wallace, Kittisak Kulvichit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate an alternative retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening system that identifies infants meriting examination by an ophthalmologist in a middleincome country. Methods: The authors hypothesized that grading posterior pole images for the presence of pre-plus or plus disease has high sensitivity to identify infants with type 1 ROP that requires treatment. Part 1 of the study evaluated the feasibility of having a non-ophthalmologist health care worker obtain retinal images of prematurely born infants using a non-contact retinal camera (Pictor; Volk Optical, Inc., Mentor, OH) that were of sufficient quality to grade for pre-plus or plus disease. Part 2 investigated the accuracy of grading these images to identify infants with type 1 ROP. The authors prospectively recruited infants at Chulalongkorn University Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand). On days infants underwent routine ROP screening, a trained health care worker imaged their retinas with Pictor. Two ROP experts graded these serial images from a remote location for image gradability and posterior pole disease. Results: Fifty-six infants were included. Overall, 69.4% of infant imaging sessions were gradable. Among gradable images, the sensitivity of both graders for identifying an infant with type 1 ROP by grading for the presence of pre-plus or plus disease was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.31 to 1.0) for grader 1 and 1.0 (95% CI: 0.40 to 1.0) for grader 2. The specificity was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.76 to 0.99) for grader 1 and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.88) for grader 2. Conclusions: It was feasible for a trained non-ophthalmologist health care worker to obtain retinal images of infants using the Pictor that were of sufficient quality to identify infants with type 1 ROP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-253
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Retinopathy of Prematurity
Thailand
Confidence Intervals
Delivery of Health Care
Mentors
Feasibility Studies
Retina

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Real-world simulation of an alternative retinopathy of prematurity screening system in Thailand : A pilot study. / Prakalapakorn, S. Grace; Freedman, Sharon F.; Hutchinson, Amy K.; Saehout, Piyada; Cetinkaya-Rundel, Mine; Wallace, David K.; Kulvichit, Kittisak.

In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Vol. 55, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 245-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prakalapakorn, S. Grace ; Freedman, Sharon F. ; Hutchinson, Amy K. ; Saehout, Piyada ; Cetinkaya-Rundel, Mine ; Wallace, David K. ; Kulvichit, Kittisak. / Real-world simulation of an alternative retinopathy of prematurity screening system in Thailand : A pilot study. In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. 2018 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 245-253.
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