Reasons that orthodontic faculty teach and consider leaving teaching.

K. Kula, A. Glaros, B. Larson, O. Tuncay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess reasons why orthodontic faculty consider leaving academia, a pretested questionnaire was mailed to 200 full-time (FT) and 200 part-time (PT) faculty randomly selected from the United States and Canada. A total of 144 (72 percent) of FT and 120 (60 percent) PT responded. About 38 percent FT and 25 percent PT were currently considering leaving academia. The average age of each group was about fifty years. Although significant differences were found in fifteen factors affecting the decision to leave, three factors ranked as most important (means> or =3.4) for FTs: salary support, financial support of department, and control over work or destiny. The three factors most important (means>3. 1) for PTs were: challenge of private practice, family commitments, and personal. FT and PT were similar in the most important and least important factors influencing their initial reasons to teach and satisfaction in teaching. However, the reasons why FT considered leaving were work related, while the PT's reasons were more personal. With the current shortage of FT orthodontic faculty becoming imminently greater, it appears that work-related issues could be addressed directly by administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-762
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume64
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Orthodontics
Teaching
time
Financial Support
Private Practice
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
salary
Canada
shortage
Age Groups
commitment
questionnaire

Cite this

Kula, K., Glaros, A., Larson, B., & Tuncay, O. (2000). Reasons that orthodontic faculty teach and consider leaving teaching. Journal of Dental Education, 64(11), 755-762.

Reasons that orthodontic faculty teach and consider leaving teaching. / Kula, K.; Glaros, A.; Larson, B.; Tuncay, O.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 64, No. 11, 2000, p. 755-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kula, K, Glaros, A, Larson, B & Tuncay, O 2000, 'Reasons that orthodontic faculty teach and consider leaving teaching.', Journal of Dental Education, vol. 64, no. 11, pp. 755-762.
Kula, K. ; Glaros, A. ; Larson, B. ; Tuncay, O. / Reasons that orthodontic faculty teach and consider leaving teaching. In: Journal of Dental Education. 2000 ; Vol. 64, No. 11. pp. 755-762.
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