Recovery from renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with altered renal hemodynamics, blunted pressure natriuresis, and sodium-sensitive hypertension

Kimberly R. Pechman, Carmen De Miguel, Hayley Lund, Ellen C. Leonard, David Basile, David L. Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present studies evaluated intrarenal hemodynamics, pressure natriuresis, and arterial blood pressure in rats following recovery from renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Acute I/R injury, induced by 40 min of bilateral renal arterial occlusion, resulted in an increase in plasma creatinine that resolved within a week. Following 5 wk of recovery on a 0.4% NaCl diet, the pressure-natriuresis response was assessed in anesthetized rats in which the kidney was denervated and extrarenal hormones were administered intravenously. Increasing renal perfusion pressure (RPP) from 107 to 141 mmHg resulted in a fourfold increase in urine flow and sodium excretion in sham control rats. In comparison, pressure diuresis and natriuresis were significantly attenuated in post-I/R rats. In sham rats, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) averaged 1.6 ± 0.2 ml·min-1·g kidney weight-1 and renal blood flow (RBF) averaged 7.8 · 0.7 ml·min -1·g kidney weight-1 at RPP of 129 mmHg. Renal cortical blood flow, measured by laser-Doppler flow-metry, was well autoregulated whereas medullary blood flow and renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure increased directly with elevated RPP in sham rats. In contrast, GFR and RBF were significantly reduced whereas medullary perfusion and interstitial pressure demonstrated an attenuated response to RPP in post-I/R rats. Further experiments demonstrated that conscious I/R rats develop hypertension when sodium intake is increased. The present data indicate that the pressure-natriuretic-diuretic response in I/R rats is blunted because of a decrease in GFR and RBF and the depressed pressure-dependent increase in medullary blood flow and interstitial pressure.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume297
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Natriuresis
Reperfusion Injury
Hemodynamics
Sodium
Hypertension
Kidney
Pressure
Renal Circulation
Perfusion
Reperfusion
Ischemia
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Weights and Measures
Hydrostatic Pressure
Diuresis
Diuretics
Creatinine
Arterial Pressure
Lasers
Urine

Keywords

  • Kidney
  • Renal blood flow
  • Renal function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Recovery from renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with altered renal hemodynamics, blunted pressure natriuresis, and sodium-sensitive hypertension. / Pechman, Kimberly R.; De Miguel, Carmen; Lund, Hayley; Leonard, Ellen C.; Basile, David; Mattson, David L.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 297, No. 5, 11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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