Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research

Wendy Levinson, Valerie T. Dull, Debra L. Roter, Nigel Chaumeton, Richard Frankel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES. Research conducted in community outpatient offices can provide insight into the common experiences of patients and physicians. However, recruiting physicians to participate in office-based research is challenging and few descriptions of methods that have been used to successfully recruit random samples of physicians are available. This article describes recruitment strategies utilized in a project that achieved high rates of participation from community-based primary care physicians and surgeons. METHODS. Recruitment methods included the use of advisory boards to identify potential barriers to participation, use of respected members of the medical community as recruiters, and obtaining endorsements from physician organizations and prominent members of the medical community. RESULTS. Overall, 81% of physicians contacted from a sample frame agreed to participate in the project. Participating physicians most frequently reported that they participated because the project could provide them with feedback about their interviewing style. CONCLUSIONS. The recruitment methods described here can be generalized to other types of investigations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)934-937
Number of pages4
JournalMedical Care
Volume36
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physicians' Offices
physician
Physicians
Research
community
Primary Care Physicians
participation
random sample
Outpatients
Organizations

Keywords

  • Community-based research
  • Physician recruitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Levinson, W., Dull, V. T., Roter, D. L., Chaumeton, N., & Frankel, R. (1998). Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research. Medical Care, 36(6), 934-937.

Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research. / Levinson, Wendy; Dull, Valerie T.; Roter, Debra L.; Chaumeton, Nigel; Frankel, Richard.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 36, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 934-937.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levinson, W, Dull, VT, Roter, DL, Chaumeton, N & Frankel, R 1998, 'Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research', Medical Care, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 934-937.
Levinson W, Dull VT, Roter DL, Chaumeton N, Frankel R. Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research. Medical Care. 1998 Jun;36(6):934-937.
Levinson, Wendy ; Dull, Valerie T. ; Roter, Debra L. ; Chaumeton, Nigel ; Frankel, Richard. / Recruiting Physicians for Office-Based Research. In: Medical Care. 1998 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 934-937.
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