Recurrent annular peripheral choroidal detachment after trabeculectomy

Shaohui Liu, Lisa L. Sun, A. Scott Kavanaugh, Marlyn P. Langford, Chanping Liang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We report a challenging case of recurrent flat anterior chamber without hypotony after trabeculectomy in a 54-year-old Black male with a remote history of steroid-treated polymyositis, cataract surgery, and uncontrolled open angle glaucoma. The patient presented with a flat chamber on postoperative day 11, but had a normal fundus exam and intraocular pressure (IOP). Flat chamber persisted despite treatment with cycloplegics, steroids, and a Healon injection into the anterior chamber. A transverse B-scan of the peripheral fundus revealed a shallow annular peripheral choroidal detachment. The suprachoroidal fluid was drained. The patient presented 3 days later with a recurrent flat chamber and an annular peripheral choroidal effusion. The fluid was removed and reinforcement of the scleral flap was performed with the resolution of the flat anterior chamber. A large corneal epithelial defect developed after the second drainage. The oral prednisone was tapered quickly and the topical steroid was decreased. One week later, his vision decreased to count fingers with severe corneal stromal edema and Descemet's membrane folds that improved to 20/50 within 24 h of resumption of the oral steroid and frequent topical steroid. The patient's visual acuity improved to 20/20 following a slow withdrawal of the oral and topical steroid. Eight months after surgery, the IOP was 15 mm Hg without glaucoma medication. The detection of a shallow anterior choroidal detachment by transverse B-scan is critical to making the correct diagnosis. Severe cornea edema can occur if the steroid is withdrawn too quickly. Thus, steroids should be tapered cautiously in steroid-dependent patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-198
Number of pages7
JournalCase Reports in Ophthalmology
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trabeculectomy
Steroids
Anterior Chamber
Intraocular Pressure
Patient Acuity
Descemet Membrane
Corneal Edema
Mydriatics
Polymyositis
Open Angle Glaucoma
Hyaluronic Acid
Prednisone
Glaucoma
Cornea
Cataract
Fingers
Visual Acuity
Drainage
Edema
Injections

Keywords

  • Annular peripheral choroidal detachment
  • Glaucoma
  • Steroid withdrawal
  • Trabeculectomy
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Recurrent annular peripheral choroidal detachment after trabeculectomy. / Liu, Shaohui; Sun, Lisa L.; Kavanaugh, A. Scott; Langford, Marlyn P.; Liang, Chanping.

In: Case Reports in Ophthalmology, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.09.2013, p. 192-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Shaohui ; Sun, Lisa L. ; Kavanaugh, A. Scott ; Langford, Marlyn P. ; Liang, Chanping. / Recurrent annular peripheral choroidal detachment after trabeculectomy. In: Case Reports in Ophthalmology. 2013 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 192-198.
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